Class Notes
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The Class Notes are the most popular section in the Alfred Magazine. For your convenience and reference, we offer these online Class Notes from past issues of the Magazine. As always, please forward any information to your class correspondents or to the Office of Communications at 607.871.2103 or via email. Check back as more Class Notes go online.

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Connie Brown Getz wrote, "Since Greene, NY, 30 miles north of Binghamton, has been an important area to my family for years, it was a pleasant surprise to read that life trustee Dr. George G. Raymond H'83 and his wife Robin Raymond have given $2 million as an endowment to the Alfred University College of Business. George Raymond built the Greene, NY, corporation into a nationally recognized manufacturer. The village of Greene is centered in a very beautiful area. Going west from Greene about eight miles to Whitney Point, one rises up onto the most beautiful hills and down into gorgeous valleys. It is like soaring through space. There are delightful little settlements named Triangle and Smithville Flats. In Whitney Point there is a reservoir for boating, swimming, and in winter, crappie fishing. The fresh air in the area is wonderful. A former treasurer of the Raymond Corp., William Lamb and his wife Helen, formerly owned our small Echo Lake near Greene. My family spent many delightful hours here on our rented lot. Now, owning the lot, son Fred of Chicago has built a beautiful vacation home on Echo Lake to carry on our family's enjoyment of this special place." Connie Getz also noted receiving a letter from your class correspondent, the Rev. Glenn E. Bucher. Mr. Bucher kindly forwarded her reply to the class notes coordinator. In part, it reads, "Dear Glenn, Thank you for your beautiful letter. You have such a fine appreciation of life. I always liked your kind smile. It said, 'I am your friend.' We need more people like you."
When Col. Larry March '45 and his wife Eddie attended the 325th Fighter Group reunion in Pittsburgh, PA, last October, they took advantage of the proximity to East Liverpool, OH, to visit Don Schreckengost and his wife, Hazel. Schreck, as he is familiarly known, was professor of industrial ceramic design at Alfred from 1935 to 1945, and very popular with his students. On leaving Alfred, he and Hazel moved to East Liverpool, where they've lived ever since. Larry reports that they had a great dinner together, and shared some very special reminiscences. Schreck gave him some souvenir tiles he had designed. One was for the Republican National Convention; one for a lunch hosted by Hillary Clinton; and one for Ollie North. (Your correspondent's comment: now, that's non-partisanship!). Hazel (nee Campbell) was a former math teacher of mine at Wellsville High School, a lady of stunning looks and intelligence. She keeps as busy as Schreck, serving on several local boards, and recently completed 40 years on the Board of the American Red Cross. Larry concludes that they are both highly personable and attractive nonagenarians, and a simply delightful couple.
1935
Peg Bedell Cantwell '35's account of the 65th reunion was very good. Ruth N. Norwood Moulton '35 spoke of the peppy bunch they had in their class, and this was in the midst of the Depression.
Peg Bedell Cantwell '35's account of the 65th reunion was very good. Ruth N. Norwood Moulton '35 spoke of the peppy bunch they had in their class, and this was in the midst of the Depression.
We were happy to read the wonderful news in the winter issue of Alfred Magazine about our classmate Lois Acker Blanchford. In the class of 1935 news, Lois and her husband, Henry Blanchford '35, are mentioned as having a very large family ... including great-grandchildren! Keeping up with all of them must surely keep them very active. We hadn't heard from Lois in a number of years, so we now know that she's been very busy. Lois, we'd love to hear from you again.
1936
As your class correspondent, I often come in contact with alums before and after my time. In early January, I had a phone call from Lillian Chavis Dixon '37 from Richmond, VA. We had a long conversation. Lillian is able to travel far and wide whenever she pleases. She recently returned home from New York City and was caught in a big snowstorm. We plan to get together when she comes to western Florida in February. We talked about the usefulness of a computer and e-mail. Asked if she has one, she replied, "No, I just play the piano." Lillian and I never met on campus, but we did meet at the AU Sarasota March annual luncheon, along with Thelma Bates Ames '36.
1937
As your class correspondent, I often come in contact with alums before and after my time. In early January, I had a phone call from Lillian Chavis Dixon '37 from Richmond, VA. We had a long conversation. Lillian is able to travel far and wide whenever she pleases. She recently returned home from New York City and was caught in a big snowstorm. We plan to get together when she comes to western Florida in February. We talked about the usefulness of a computer and e-mail. Asked if she has one, she replied, "No, I just play the piano." Lillian and I never met on campus, but we did meet at the AU Sarasota March annual luncheon, along with Thelma Bates Ames '36.
It was reassuring to have one's efforts at editing be recognized, as was done on page 27 of our winter issue. At times, I wonder if I'm going to get any input, but then I always latch onto something. This was apparent when I called Pearl and Stan Lull in Kennebunk, ME. Although I'd been a guest many times at their Maine home and at Tarpon Springs, FL, and had been with them at Reunion, the phone call produced news about them. We recalled that during the first Bush presidency, we sat directly in back of the Bush family in church. After the service, we had the honor of meeting Billy Graham. While talking to Stan, I brought up the subject of his Ph.D. from Ohio State. Advanced degrees were not as common as today. Dr. Sam Scholes had recommended him to Ohio State. As part of Stan's work there, the knowledge of two foreign languages was required - French and scientific German. I remember taking scientific German for math and science degrees, but you rarely hear of that type of German otherwise. When the war came, Stan wanted to enlist in the Navy but was put on defense work. I got to know Stan and Pearl at reunions. Often we would be at Doris and Sam Scholes's home. One time Pearl and the late Steve Bartlett discovered they had worked for the same company on different floors, years ago in Worcester, MA. Small world.
In a conversation with Peg Reilley-King of Matthews, NC, she remembered that several Sigma Chi Nu girls would meet in New York. "Meet me at the Astor" was the word, although lunch was at Schraffts on Fifth Avenue. Peg and Marion Phillips Bartlett would come from New Jersey, leave Peg's car on the New Jersey side of the George Washington Bridge, then take the bus. I missed these summer jaunts as I was in the Catskills. Radio City Music Hall was on their schedule. As long as they got there by noon, admission was 99 cents. (In 2000, a ticket cost $80.) I made a second call to Peg, as I wanted to know more about her volunteer work of teaching French where she lives. I can see why it has continued to be successful, knowing her background. At AU, she majored in Latin and English and minored in French. Added to that were trips to France. Miss Cheval was her French teacher and friend. In 1937, after the end of school, Peg and the late Ruth Crawford Frank '38 went to New York to say "bon voyage" to Miss Cheval. They boarded the Ile de France and partied. Little did they know, they were not to see her again. After arriving in France, she sent them a short note saying that her family was being evacuated. Another follow-up on Peg's story is that her daughter, Roblyn King Potter '63, taught French for many years in Rochester. She is an AU graduate who completed college in three and a half years, taking summer work. She got a job and married. Peg Reilley-King and I hope to get together one of these days. We have seen each other only once, in Richmond, since 1937, and that was when Sigma Chi had a get-together at the Omni. I am glad to see interest in a foreign language. For years, languages were not required in U.S. colleges. When I substituted in Toledo as a math major, I often taught French, Latin, and German. My Latin goes back to high school ...
1938
Connie Brown Getz wrote, "Since Greene, NY, 30 miles north of Binghamton, has been an important area to my family for years, it was a pleasant surprise to read that life trustee Dr. George G. Raymond H'83 and his wife Robin Raymond have given $2 million as an endowment to the Alfred University College of Business. George Raymond built the Greene, NY, corporation into a nationally recognized manufacturer. The village of Greene is centered in a very beautiful area. Going west from Greene about eight miles to Whitney Point, one rises up onto the most beautiful hills and down into gorgeous valleys. It is like soaring through space. There are delightful little settlements named Triangle and Smithville Flats. In Whitney Point there is a reservoir for boating, swimming, and in winter, crappie fishing. The fresh air in the area is wonderful. A former treasurer of the Raymond Corp., William Lamb and his wife Helen, formerly owned our small Echo Lake near Greene. My family spent many delightful hours here on our rented lot. Now, owning the lot, son Fred of Chicago has built a beautiful vacation home on Echo Lake to carry on our family's enjoyment of this special place." Connie Getz also noted receiving a letter from your class correspondent, the Rev. Glenn E. Bucher. Mr. Bucher kindly forwarded her reply to the class notes coordinator. In part, it reads, "Dear Glenn, Thank you for your beautiful letter. You have such a fine appreciation of life. I always liked your kind smile. It said, 'I am your friend.' We need more people like you."
1940
Margaret Ames Parker and her husband, Merle Parker '40, celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary with a dinner at their favorite Thai restaurant, hosted by Marg's niece and her husband. For their 50th anniversary, Marg recollects, the whole family converged, and had a grand celebration, lasting a number of days. A video had been made, encompassing that famous purple dinosaur "Barney," technology (innovations for which the family is well known); incorporating old pictures and music selections. A picnic and a splendid dinner rounded out the festivities. Now Marg and Merle hope to make it to their 60th, when for sure they'll be feted with something really special!
1941
Lennie Cole Landis '41 has done some traveling, and in June went on a safari to Africa, including Kenya. She even managed a hot-air balloon ride.
Peter J. Keenan Sr. sent a copy of the Buffalo News obituary for Alfred G. Dyer '39, who died Jan. 11, 2001. "Al was captain of the wrestling team in 1938-39 when Dr. Joe Seidlin was coach," Peter wrote. "He was also a member and officer of Kappa Psi Upsilon - a fraternity brother of mine."
Betty "Tim" Kaiser Wheeler '41 stays busy and happy with her tennis and bowling in the field of sports, chorus and choir in the field of music, and considerable volunteer work in the church and community. "Keeps one going," she says.
Bob Sinclair '43 writes from Laguna Niguel, CA, still an avid walking golfer two or three times a week. He and wife Patsy Murphy Sinclair joined Bob Humphrey '41 and Jane Bray Humphrey '43 for their annual Christmas get-together. Bob Sinclair gave us the sad news of the death of Ralph Rhodes Jr. on Dec. 22, 2000. Ralph was a friend to all.
The story of your correspondent's remarriage was sent to us by his son G. Douglas Clarke. Doug wrote, "There were all kinds of Alfred University connections on Aug. 5, 2000, when David Stillman Clarke, widower of Frances Polan Clarke '42, married Ethel Davis Dickinson '46, widow of C. Harmon Dickinson '45, at her home in Fort Mill, SC. The ceremony was performed by Ethel's granddaughter's husband, Kenneth R. Lake Jr., pastor of the Spring Hope, NC, Baptist Church, and a reception was held at the Fort Mill Unity Presbyterian Church. David Clarke is the son of AU Education Professor Ford Stillman Clarke '10 and AU Home Economics Instructor Agnes Kenyon Clarke Bond '09, who later married Ahva John Clarence Bond, Dean of AU Theological School. Ethel Dickinson worked as a secretary in the office of John Reed Spicer, who was counselor to prospective students, while attending classes at AU in 1942. She transferred and received her BA in social science from Salem, WV, College in 1957." Much later, we received a note from Dave Clarke himself: "Many AU '41'ers, no doubt, joined the millions who watched TV coverage of the 19th winter Olympics in Utah," he says. "Unlike our grandchildren - and even our children - who can imagine themselves doing some wintry death-defying slaloms, jumps, or moguls, my wife Ethel and I enjoyed South Carolina warmth and calm. Since our marriage in August 2000, we have stayed on softened earth year-round - winters at her Fort Mill, SC, home and summers at my Clarke-Kenyon home in Alfred. (By the way, Ethel was the office secretary for John Reed Spicer, counselor for prospective students, when her first husband, Harmon Dickinson, was at the AU School of Theology in the early '40s.) Deeply enjoying Casey Fitz Randolph's efforts in the short speed-skate races with his taking the gold medal, we were not totally surprised with a TV spotlight. Sweeping the cheering fans, the cameras zoomed in on Casey's grandparents, the Ivan Fitz Randolphs of Milton, WI. Ivan's eyesight is very limited, so the special magnifiers let him see Casey but did not prevent our seeing his happy face. Special for us was the fact of Ethel's professional association with Mr. Randolph at the North American Center of the Seventh Day Baptist Conference at Janesville, WI. He was business manager; she was executive secretarial supervisor." - Dave Clarke
Jean Van Strien Ammerman '41 is happy with retirement living. It takes a bit of getting used to, she said, but she now enjoys the people.
1942
Bob Sinclair '43 writes from Laguna Niguel, CA, still an avid walking golfer two or three times a week. He and wife Patsy Murphy Sinclair joined Bob Humphrey '41 and Jane Bray Humphrey '43 for their annual Christmas get-together. Bob Sinclair gave us the sad news of the death of Ralph Rhodes Jr. on Dec. 22, 2000. Ralph was a friend to all.
For those of our class, the big birthday is upon us. My 80th in January 2001, with a family get-together to celebrate, was the happiest birthday of all. It seems only yesterday I was 17, entering Alfred University in '38. One last plea: Let me hear from you. Tell us about your Alfred days -- living in the Brick and Bartlett, frosh-soph fights in front of the Brick, the black knight, St. Pats, and your thoughts of a favorite professor. Let's keep the class of 1942 alive. Counting on you. - Betty Stangl Thomas.
David Nordquist, always faithful with his yearly highlights. He spent Christmas '99 in the USA for the first time in 19 years, and in February he was in Malavi with his daughter-in-law, who was teaching at a Free Methodist Bible school while David did maintenance jobs. In March 2000 he was in South Africa, where he enjoyed a Christmas present of a hot-air balloon ride.
Jean Collier Parks is one busy lady in her new retirement residence, Collingswood Manor in New Jersey. The warmth and friendliness of staff and residents have made a very happy year for her. Her husband Alan Parks, who passed away last year, set an example of remembering names, and the required "hello" at AU helped her learn to get to know people quickly.
1943
I had a delightful Christmas note from Helen Nelson Dygert, who celebrated her 80th birthday in July 2000. With a touch of humor, she relates how she suddenly had to develop a relationship with a plastic pill container, which she formerly had disdained. (A development many of us experience, Helen!) However, indications were that she was keeping reasonably well, and looking forward to a large family gathering at Christmas.
After recovery from a setback in health, Rusty Woelfel Cunningham '43 and her husband Paul Cunningham went to Prague, Vienna, and Budapest, enjoying particularly the architecture. As I write these notes on Feb. 1, Rusty and Paul are going through the Panama Canal.
It was with deep regret that I read in the winter 2000 issue of the Magazine that Bob Starr had lost his wife, Elaine Beckstrand Starr '44, Sept. 1, 2000. I then sent our belated and deep condolences. Bob and Elaine attended our 50th reunion in 1993, and I remember thinking how little she had changed from the pretty, personable girl of our student days.
Emma Jo Hill Potter, my roommate at the Brick for three years, lives in a large picture-book house in Avon-By-the-Sea, NJ. She writes that she and an old friend, Grace Bruno, with whom she shared an accounting business, were geared up for income tax time, but were limiting the number of their clients this year. Weather permitting, they enjoy walks along the ocean beach, where the salt air blows away any mental "cobwebs", and the exercise is a great physiological boost.
A January phone call from Bob Sinclair brought the welcome news that his wife, Patsy, was once again on the golf course, engaged in her favorite pastime. She made a really remarkable recovery from her bypass surgery in August of last year. As early as September, Bob and Patsy made a leisurely trip to Stockton, CA, to attend the fall meeting of the California Historical Society. Because of the surgery, Bob sent one of his grandsons, Cameron, to take his place on a fishing trip to Sitka, Alaska. Cameron turned out to be a wise choice, as the fishing buddies got into some large halibut, and the young man was a great help in hauling them into the boat from some 300 feet below the surface. Bob and Patsy had their customary holiday lunch at the Del Coronado with Bob Humphrey '41 and his wife Jane Bray Humphrey, who were visiting relatives in the area. The Sinclairs were looking forward to meeting President Charles Edmondson and his wife, Dr. Laura Greyson, who would be guests at an alumni reception in Costa Mesa Jan. 25. Bob indicated that he would be having lunch with the new AU president and his wife the previous day. Mike Hyde, VP for University Relations, would be accompanying the honorees from Alfred.
Bob Sinclair '43 writes from Laguna Niguel, CA, still an avid walking golfer two or three times a week. He and wife Patsy Murphy Sinclair joined Bob Humphrey '41 and Jane Bray Humphrey '43 for their annual Christmas get-together. Bob Sinclair gave us the sad news of the death of Ralph Rhodes Jr. on Dec. 22, 2000. Ralph was a friend to all.
Margaret Ames Parker and her husband, Merle Parker '40, celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary with a dinner at their favorite Thai restaurant, hosted by Marg's niece and her husband. For their 50th anniversary, Marg recollects, the whole family converged, and had a grand celebration, lasting a number of days. A video had been made, encompassing that famous purple dinosaur "Barney," technology (innovations for which the family is well known); incorporating old pictures and music selections. A picnic and a splendid dinner rounded out the festivities. Now Marg and Merle hope to make it to their 60th, when for sure they'll be feted with something really special!
Isabel Riggs Geibel, at 80 years of age, keeps so busy that her activities and interests alone could fill the class notes column for at least three issues of the Magazine! Her holiday letter was so involved that I'll recount only some highlights. Isabel keeps active in her many affiliations with military and veterans' groups, social services retirees, and genealogical and historical associations. Her latest membership is with the New Society of the Genesee. In January of last year, they met in Canandaigua, NY, Isabel's home town, at a place next door to a building that was her father's gas station from 1928 to 1934. In August, they had a picnic at an 1880 cottage in a remote area near Canandaigua Lake, about two miles from where Isabel's grandparents lived after emigrating from England. Her bus tours and motor trips could fill a travel book! In a variety of venues, she saw and heard several celebrity singers and popular musicals, among them, Roy Clark, Engelbert Humperdinck, Victor/Victoria, Lion King, and Evita. Her boat excursions ranged from circling the entirety of bustling Manhattan to cruising the tranquil Squam Lake, NH, where the movie On Golden Pond was filmed. After reading about all her adventures and exploits, one begins to believe that Isabel must be an ubiquitous being, capable of being in several places at the same time! Her energy and ambition appear limitless, and I hope this longtime friend continues to enjoy these blessings.
Rhoda Ungar Jost '43, with a friend dating back to kindergarten days, made a trip to Costa Rica, with transit through the Panama Canal. With husband Slim she went on a tour to the Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Ontario. A new member of the Jost household is Moe, a big, heavy, handsome black and white cat. Moe, age 11, was given to them by the former owner, who left the Toledo area.
Virginia L. Repert sent a note: "Greetings and best wishes ... Daily routine - winterized elk are down from the mountains, trading places with the skiers. Currently about 300 elk move over our dried and overgrazed drought-ridden valley floor, eating what horses have left ... good neighbors. Our train takes a holiday trip through the scenic lower half of the valley ... It's thrilling to go all the way to Silverton ... (although) tourists will sue if they don't get there, or their families would. It's still spectacular by road. I'm proud to read in the news about Alfred University's leadership."
J. David Broudo, Distinguished Professor Emeritus and artist-in-residence at Endicott College in Beverly, MA, probably had a lifetime dream fulfilled when he headed a tour group of Endicott alumni to Italy last November. I had asked him to write me about it, and he kindly complied, with one of the most compelling and concise accounts of the Italian Renaissance I ever read! The tour started in Rome and Vatican City, with its classical monuments, and the treasures of the Vatican Museum. From there the group traveled to Umbria and Assisi, where the Basilica of St. Francis held the splendid frescoes of Giotto. Then on to Perugia, and to "the gentle city of Siena" (David's phrase), where the Renaissance started. Florence was one of the highlights, with Michelangelo's David, great cathedrals, and the treasures of the Uffizi Museum, altogether, the ambience of a great cultural center. Venice was unique and special, as advertised. The group toured St. Mark's Basilica, viewed splendid art in the Doge's Palace, and were treated to a gondola serenade cruise on the Grand Canal. The tour ended in the lake district at the beautiful resort of Como. Throughout the travel, David previewed each memorable experience with lectures that made the trip more meaningful to the tour group. After lecturing for 50 years on the great art of Italy, David continues, seeing it was so very special. Especially impressive were the mosaic-covered interior of the cathedral in Ravenna, Giotto's frescoes in Assisi, and Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel ceiling, which was overwhelming. A unique and "It's a small world" moment came to David and his wife, Barbara, during a leisurely stroll near their hotel in Rome. A woman approached him and said, "You're Professor Broudo." He was amazed to learn that she had been in one of his history of art classes 40 years ago! It seemed she had worked on an airline, had met and fallen in love with an Italian gentleman, and had lived in Rome ever since. She later met the group, and talked with them about everyday life in Rome. I don't think any travel news could top David's informative, rewarding account of his Renaissance tour. Of course, I wouldn't be surprised if Isabel Geibel took a space flight to the moon one day! Please keep in touch from wherever you are, dear friends, whether it's outer space or Hometown, USA.
Bob Sinclair '43 writes from Laguna Niguel, CA, still an avid walking golfer two or three times a week. He and wife Patsy Murphy Sinclair joined Bob Humphrey '41 and Jane Bray Humphrey '43 for their annual Christmas get-together. Bob Sinclair gave us the sad news of the death of Ralph Rhodes Jr. on Dec. 22, 2000. Ralph was a friend to all.
1944
Dorothy Robbins Vedder '44 chairs the resident council in a retirement community in Easley, SC. Dot reports that she loves to travel and has recently traveled to Botswana and Zimbabwe, and plans to visit Switzerland and Austria soon. She lives close to Jeannette Milnes Cottrell and they keep in touch. Dot, Jeannette, Jane Parvin Pack, and I lived close in the Brick and we all pledged Pi Alpha Pi together. Jane was my roommate at Alfred for four years. We have remained good friends but have not seen each other for 10 years. I will always remember that her parents were very kind to me when they realized I was an orphan. I was sorry to hear that Jane's husband, Ben, died last May after 48 years of marriage. She reports that she is adjusting, and I hope to visit her next summer.
It was with deep regret that I read in the winter 2000 issue of the Magazine that Bob Starr had lost his wife, Elaine Beckstrand Starr '44, Sept. 1, 2000. I then sent our belated and deep condolences. Bob and Elaine attended our 50th reunion in 1993, and I remember thinking how little she had changed from the pretty, personable girl of our student days.
1945
I was delighted to hear from Jeannette Milnes Cottrell. She lives in Knoxville, TN, and keeps busy serving as her church's librarian, recording for the blind, and singing in the church choir. She loves to play bridge. Jeannette and I married fraternity brothers, and for many years we kept in touch. She sent me a picture of her family, which now numbers 23. We plan to visit each other soon and talk about our large families.
When Col. Larry March '45 and his wife Eddie attended the 325th Fighter Group reunion in Pittsburgh, PA, last October, they took advantage of the proximity to East Liverpool, OH, to visit Don Schreckengost and his wife, Hazel. Schreck, as he is familiarly known, was professor of industrial ceramic design at Alfred from 1935 to 1945, and very popular with his students. On leaving Alfred, he and Hazel moved to East Liverpool, where they've lived ever since. Larry reports that they had a great dinner together, and shared some very special reminiscences. Schreck gave him some souvenir tiles he had designed. One was for the Republican National Convention; one for a lunch hosted by Hillary Clinton; and one for Ollie North. (Your correspondent's comment: now, that's non-partisanship!). Hazel (nee Campbell) was a former math teacher of mine at Wellsville High School, a lady of stunning looks and intelligence. She keeps as busy as Schreck, serving on several local boards, and recently completed 40 years on the Board of the American Red Cross. Larry concludes that they are both highly personable and attractive nonagenarians, and a simply delightful couple.
Larry March provides me with news frequently. Larry and his wife Eddie celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in November 2000. He reports that he was asked to serve as master of ceremonies at the rally of AU Florida West Coast alumni at Bird Key, Sarasota, FL, on March 3.
1948
George Tappan '50, Univ. of Kansas '51, and his wife Lois Sutton Tappan '48: "Not having graduated with the class of '50, I seem to have lost contact over the years. We lived for 23 years overseas, have three grown children, all taking care of themselves, and three grandchildren. Life has been good to us as I hope it has been for all AU '50s. I would enjoy hearing from anyone. "I had been living in Colombia for two years when Lois and I were married in the Gothic Chapel, Alfred, in 1953. Following that we lived another 15-plus years in Colombia, Venezuela, and Peru, where our kids were raised, and five years in Tripoli, Libya, before returning to the US in 1975. I was (and am) an international petroleum exploration geologist. Lois requires total care now, but we have our routine and everything we need, so all is well enough at present. Congratulations to Christopher (David A. Crump's son) for his prowess in music. He may be interested to know that our daughter, Margaret, based in San Francisco, currently has a dance contract with Houston Grand Opera for Borodin's "Prince Igor" through mid-February. We're just 25 miles from Houston, so we have had a chance to see a bit of her now and then." You can reach George Tappan by email at gtappan@hal-pc.org.
Received an e-mail from Johnnie Seidlin Nov. 7, 2000, telling of his trip with his wife, Joanne Rogers Seidlin, to New Zealand and on to Australia for Olympic activities. Then they were headed to Hong Kong to a medical conference. Included in the e-mail were a dozen photographs, compressed, which took almost all our computer memory and that of our e-mail carrier too. Even compressed, the photos were excellent; I did not have the right paper to print them to include them with this text.
Mimi Tooke Polan and I spent a very pleasant full summer in Florida this year - a summer with NO hurricanes, no torrential downpours, and only moderate heat, which was easily tolerated by the use of our small pool once or twice a day. With the exception of about six times, we were in the pool every evening from early May until Nov. 15 without using the pool water heater; air temperatures in the low 60s finally deterred us. Days were in the 80s to keep the water warm enough to the mid-November date. Who else did something in the past six months about which the rest of us would like to hear? We my all be retired by now, but we are still keeping busy doing something or going somewhere.
One note came in after this went off to the Office of Communications. Astrid Robillard Johnson wrote: "I just got the winter issue, and as usual, enjoyed reading about everyone. Norma Jacox Stoneham still is recognizable in the photo of the Sigma Chi girls' reunion. Ruth Ann Galloway Farr hasn't aged at all. I have moved to Austin, TX, to be near one of my four sons (the only one who lives where it's fairly warm.) I wonder if there is an alumni group in this area like the ones I've known in Buffalo and St. Pete. If so, I'd appreciate being put in touch. I don't remember Wallace Davidow but the class of '48 was diverse. Did you know Doris Hagberg died just before Christmas? Her husband Carl Hagberg lives in Jamestown, NY, now, near his son,Jon "Mat" Hagberg '69.
1950
Herb McDonell writes: "We went to the two Bloodstain Evidence Institutes in Holland and then toured not only Holland but Belgium, Luxembourg, and Germany, where my brother was in the liberation forces back in 1944-1945. It was an incredible experience seeing the places where he was during the Battle of the Bulge and having a running commentary as to the significance of every bridge and ridge. I appeared on "Dateline" on Jan. 5, 2001, in a story about the Clayton Johnson case in Nova Scotia. If you do not know the case, Mr. Johnson was convicted of the murder of his wife but in fact, forensic pathology proved it to be the accident I postulated."
Melvin G. Nida, Th.D., writes: "I was one of the Alfred Seminary graduates in (1950) who received an excellent specialized education. Just this year the final Dean of that school, Albert N. Rogers, died, as have other excellent Alfred University teachers whom we will never forget. It is in the tradition that each of us, I believe, has had an impress upon others of whom we are not aware who have benefited from the knowledge we acquired at Alfred. It is that which makes life all worthwhile. Sorry I could not attend the bicentennial class celebrations owing to a grandson's high school graduation."
David Crump also reflected on the California power crisis: Once in the crisis we were without power for 90 minutes. Not difficult for us, but deeply costly to industry. Stores and plants are often on one-half illumination. Part of our strength in the light of management stupidity is that citizens cut back quickly, preventing blackout necessity.
David A. Crump reports: "Our 16-year-old, Christopher, was invited with 500 other Bay Area high school musicians to observe the San Francisco Opera in rehearsal. Christopher is lead trumpet in his band. Suddenly, he and four others were invited to come into the pit and play with the orchestra. Two days later, word came that he was invited back to sit in the pit during the final performance of Mozart's "Magic Flute." Since it was sold out his mother and I did manage to purchase standing room. After the first act, somehow we were invited to join Christopher in the pit. He really enjoyed it and we just glowed ....
George Tappan '50, Univ. of Kansas '51, and his wife Lois Sutton Tappan '48: "Not having graduated with the class of '50, I seem to have lost contact over the years. We lived for 23 years overseas, have three grown children, all taking care of themselves, and three grandchildren. Life has been good to us as I hope it has been for all AU '50s. I would enjoy hearing from anyone. "I had been living in Colombia for two years when Lois and I were married in the Gothic Chapel, Alfred, in 1953. Following that we lived another 15-plus years in Colombia, Venezuela, and Peru, where our kids were raised, and five years in Tripoli, Libya, before returning to the US in 1975. I was (and am) an international petroleum exploration geologist. Lois requires total care now, but we have our routine and everything we need, so all is well enough at present. Congratulations to Christopher (David A. Crump's son) for his prowess in music. He may be interested to know that our daughter, Margaret, based in San Francisco, currently has a dance contract with Houston Grand Opera for Borodin's "Prince Igor" through mid-February. We're just 25 miles from Houston, so we have had a chance to see a bit of her now and then." You can reach George Tappan by email at gtappan@hal-pc.org.
1951
Your correspondent forwarded a note from Bill "Willie" Clark, coordinator for the class's 50th reunion, to be held June 1-3, 2001. "I would like to get as many of our group as possible to attend," Bill wrote. "I have heard via Christmas greetings from Dot and Pete Dahoda and Kurt Wray and Torj Goodrich Wray that they plan to attend, and I am hoping to hear from other friends in the next few months so I can use them as an inducement for others to sign up. It's been cold down here in Florida recently. I'm getting ready for a show in April at Jekyll Island, GA. Look for a letter or two from AU about the reunion soon. I can be reached at clarkart@hitter.net."
Wally Higgins, who taught industrial ceramic design - raw materials and glaze calculation and design, and the making of models and molds - at AU for 24 years, still lives nearby with his wife, Norma Miller Higgins '51, who actually wrote the note. Wally does various consulting jobs in local projects. "He has had three shows that included some very imaginative one-of-a-kind sculptures as well as reproduceable pieces in ceramics, wood, and metal," Norma wrote. "Clocks have been a favorite vehicle, and fish a favorite subject. (In retirement), his problem-solving skills have led him from students to companies in Brazil, El Salvador, Egypt, Morocco, Sri Lanka twice, and Zambia."
1952
After finishing medical school and spending five years in the Navy, three with the Marines at Parris Island, Boris Astrachan and his wife, Batja Sanders, settled in New Haven, CT. Boris finished psychiatric training there and in 1963 joined the faculty of Yale. They raised their four children in New Haven, and Boris became a professor in 1971 and directed the Connecticut Health Center for 17 years. In 1990 they moved to Chicago, where Boris became head of the department of psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He oversaw the growth of his department over seven years, from an annual budget of about $3 million to $28 million. He resigned as department head in 1997 and stayed as acting head until his successor was chosen the next year. When he gave up his administrative role, the university and college honored him with the title Distinguished Professor. Also, he was named a Distinguished Alumnus of Albany Medical College in 1999.
Bradley Kinsman writes, "I retired in 1992 after 37 years with Corning Glass Works/Corning, Inc., and spent the last 15 years of that time as manager of the furnace construction department responsible for he repair and construction of the company's furnaces worldwide. Needless to say, I did a horrendous amount of traveling worldwide, so now I have no interest in traveling any more than necessary. (He lives in Painted Post, NY.) I've been busy the last three years as project advisor to the 171 Cedar Arts Center's $3.5 million expansion in Corning, but now that's done and I'm really retiring this time. I'm blessed with five fabulous children plus their wives, significant others, and seven grandchildren - a fantastic brood. All five of the children have great jobs and are doing extremely well; I'm very proud of them all." Brad's e-mail address is bkinsman@stny.rr.com.
Armand "Ding" Beaudoin reports that he lives on the south shore of Chesapeake Bay and is working for United Technologies Services, a company that cleans navy ships. ("They get real dirty," he says.) He is also a partner in a firm that specializes in computer protection and anti-theft devices. "Fortunately, Inge Moeller Hess '54 lives near here in Yorktown, VA, and keeps me up to date on Alfred activities. I cook and sip a little, they eat and sip a little, so everyone is happy."
Neil August, reviewing his career, says he graduated from Tulane University School of Medicine in 1955, then interned and served in the Air Force for two years on active duty, plus six more in the reserves. His residency training in obstetrics and gynecology was in New Orleans and New York, followed by private practice, then a full-time teaching position for seven years at the University of Colorado Medical School in Denver. He retired in 1993 and moved to West Palm Beach, FL. He and his wife Joan, who have been married 48 years, have four daughters and four grandchildren. You can learn more from him by e-mail, docgyn@aol.com. (Wouldn't you know?)
Allen Baxter, reporting from West Chester, OH, says, "My Alfred claim to fame is that (I was) the only engineering student who ever fell asleep during the differential calculus final exam, which may have been related to my draft notice shortly thereafter." He says he is currently "Ohio's air defense ace, patrolling our north coast." (Ed. note: You never know what invaders might sneak in over Lake Erie.) Allen says there are several classmates he'd like to locate, and suggested that the class correspondent build up a file of addresses. "I correspond with Bob "Chink" Mangels, who grew up in Garden City, Long Island, and still lives there, playing his trombone in Dixieland and big bands," he notes. Allen remembers his days at AU fondly, despite the fact that it took him five-plus years to complete a four-year course. He adds, "In the supermarket of life, may all four wheels on your grocery cart travel in the same direction," and includes a sketch of an election ballot he proposes for seniors: a bingo card.
Val Cushing, who operates Val M. Cushing/VC Pottery at Alfred Station, said in a personal note to the correspondent, "I never left Alfred (after graduating) except for two years in the army and one year of teaching at the University of Illinois at the Champagne-Urbana campus. I have never felt like an alumnus, but did have as many of our art and design class of '52 as I could get to come to our house during the last class reunion." Writing to everyone, he continued, "I retired in 1997, purposely waiting for that year so I could make it an even 40 years. Elsie Brown Cushing '60 and I have four children and six grandchildren. Three of our children live and work in or near Alfred. Mark and his wife Kate make bagpipes for their living in Andover, NY. Karen Cushing '80 works in the office of Tinkertown Hardware and lives on High Street in Alfred. Nancy Cushing-Daniels '80 teaches Spanish and her husband, Brendan, teaches economics at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania, and Eric Cushing '97 and his wife Evi own and run Cafe ZA, Alfred's newest restaurant on Main Street. I am still making pottery in my Alfred studio. My work can be seen in galleries in Chicago; Scottsdale, AZ; Creedmore, NC; and Atlanta, and in various museums and private collections around the country. Elsie and I were in England from March 15-July 15, 2000, while I was an artist-in-residence at the University of Wolverhampton. We stayed with close friends in Shropshire. While there, I had exhibitions in London and Wolverhampton and gave lectures and demonstrations in London, Wolverhampton, and Limerick, Ireland. I still teach occasionally in summer schools at places like Haystack, ME; Anderson Ranch, CO; and Penland, NC, but since retirement am trying to focus my (remaining) energy on my own work. I hope many of you will share news for Alfred Magazine; I'd like to hear from you. My address is 1497 Water Wells Road, Alfred Station, NY 14803. E-mail is Cushingve@infoblvd.net."
In 1952, shortly after receiving an MFA in ceramic design from AU, Jerry Ackerman moved with his wife Evelyn from Detroit to Los Angeles and set up a ceramic studio: Jenev Design Studio. Most of Jerry's previous work was hand-thrown stoneware, but with knowledge gained at AU, he developed a line of slip-cast pieces, which he spent a year designing, working out black and white glazes, and making molds in classic shapes. They were well received, he says, and were sold nationally through independent representatives and Paul McCobb furniture showrooms in major cities. Jerry and Evelyn received considerable publicity and many of the pieces were included in national ceramic and craft exhibitions. To augment their income, Evelyn, who also holds an MFA, created a stream of mosaics, handwoven tapestries and rugs, and carved wood plaques that were sold nationally to interior designers, architects, and contemporary furniture stores. As that part of the business grew, it became increasingly difficult for Jerry to spend time on ceramics, and for nearly 30 years he was not involved in clay but was busy developing and designing other products and running the growing business, now named ERA Industries. About 10 years ago, Jerry's love of pottery led him to resume throwing. He sells his pots through several galleries and to collectors. Several have been acquired by museums, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Renwick Gallery, the Smithsonian Institution, Oakland Museum, and the Schein-Joseph International Museum of Ceramic Art at Alfred University. Recently Jo Lauria, assistant curator of decorative arts at LACMA, selected one of Jerry's hand thrown stoneware pots for an exhibition called "Color and Fire" and a slip-cast piece for an upcoming show to be called "Made in California." Some of Jerry's pieces are being shown in the museum, displayed on Charles Eames and Van Keppel Green furniture from the same period. About a year ago, Jerry noted rekindled interest in the designs of the 1950s and '60s and decided to produce some of the Jenev pieces in limited quantities using the original molds. He is now casting them in porcelain and has replaced the original black and white glazes with more colorful ones. The simplicity and clarity of the original designs are still satisfying to him, he says, and he is gratified to see his pieces stand the test of time.
Nancy Frank Henion sent a "catching-up note on my life, travels, work, and retirement." She earned a master's degree in social work in 1954 at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and worked in the pediatrics and child psychiatry departments of University Hospital. After a stretch at Vanderbilt University Hospital in Nashville, she returned to Cleveland, where her three children, Doug, Scott, and Paul, were born. After another spell in Nashville, she moved to Brockport, NY, and then to Rochester. She retired in 1995 from the Spencerport School District, where she had been the first master's degree social worker hired by any school district in that area. She spends summers at her cottage on the St. Lawrence River near Brockville, Ont., where she entertains her family, which includes four grandchildren. Her interests include developing high-quality early-childhood day-care centers, taking sunrise and wildlife photos, and working with ceramics and art.
Wally Higgins, who taught industrial ceramic design - raw materials and glaze calculation and design, and the making of models and molds - at AU for 24 years, still lives nearby with his wife, Norma Miller Higgins '51, who actually wrote the note. Wally does various consulting jobs in local projects. "He has had three shows that included some very imaginative one-of-a-kind sculptures as well as reproduceable pieces in ceramics, wood, and metal," Norma wrote. "Clocks have been a favorite vehicle, and fish a favorite subject. (In retirement), his problem-solving skills have led him from students to companies in Brazil, El Salvador, Egypt, Morocco, Sri Lanka twice, and Zambia."
Johnson "Bill" Wood reports, "Peggy and I lived happily on Hartsville Hill in the town of Alfred for 10 years or so, and two years ago moved to Crawfordsville, FL. We've made a pretty good adjustment to the Big Bend, although it was a wrenching experience for me. I am now vice president of Tallahassee Writers Association and editor of our annual short story publication, Seven Hills Review. Last year I founded a local group, which we call WOW! Writers of Wakulla. I have also done a couple of talks for the World War II Historical Society in Tallahassee. It's a chance to tell war stories to whole bunches of people who want to listen. It would be good if lots of men and women who served during that time got in touch with WWII history programs and got their experiences into the record for future generations. Programs can be found on the internet under WWII. We are getting to be an endangered species ... I'd really like to hear from any Saxons who'd care to write." His address is 271 Emmett Whaley Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, e-mail jwmf@istal.com.
Emily Worth Robinson, class correspondent emeritus, had three poems published in the Dan River 2001 Anthology. One, she says, is ekphrastic - meaning that it's verse about a work of art, a Monet painting.
Harrison "Dave" Woodin retired in 1994 from Instrumentation Service, Inc., which he owned, and since then has been dividing his time between Reno, where he lives, and Washington, where his wife, Terry Stern Woodin '54, works for the National Science Foundation. He says, "I am a volunteer at George Washington University ceramic department, and keep all their equipment in working order. Because I enjoy ceramics so much, I applied for graduate school at GWU. Last year I had the opportunity to spend October in Japan while my wife was on assignment in Nagano, Tokyo, and Sapporo. I put my Japanese rail pass to good use and spent my time going to museums and famous kiln sites, plus as many shrines as possible."
I sent a letter to Martin Moskoff at his last address of record, West 246th Street in the Bronx, but it was returned by the post office stamped "Moved, left no address." Anybody have a new address?
Donald Boulton spent the fall of 1999 at St. Andrews University, St. Mary's College, in Scotland as a visiting scholar working in the areas of theology and sociology. Last fall he returned and will be serving for a year as a visiting scholar and consultant. He was also reappointed a clinic professor for the next three years at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the school of education. He just turned 70 and enjoyed a birthday party with his seven grandchildren. "Life is good and I'm having fun," he notes.
Jim Quackenbush sent along a whole resume, updated. Here are the highlights: After graduating from AU he went to infantry officers candidate school, then left the army in 1954 as a first lieutenant to go to Fairleigh Dickinson University, where he received a second bachelor's degree, this one in accounting. He was managing partner in the accounting firm of Malesardi, Quackenbush, Swift, & Co. until he retired in 1989. He is a member of the former president of the Holland Society of New York, is a member of the American Institute of CPAs, was a director and once president of Cedar Lawn Cemetery, and for 24 years has been a trustee of Zabriske House. He has also been a trustee and for a time president of Greater Paterson General Hospital, and is a past president of the Wyckoff, NJ, Jaycees and the Wyckoff Public Library. He was the first treasurer of the Restore Ellis Island Committee and is a former trustee and treasurer of the Volunteer Bureau of Bergen County. For eight years, he taught at Fairleigh Dickinson University's evening program. And now the bad news. Jim says, "I've had prostate cancer for 12 years and am now getting major chemotherapy."
1953
Flying in from San Diego for the latter ceremony was Arthur Cummins '53, a 1958 grad of Albany Medical College, and his wife Eileen Kweller Cummins. Boris says he intends to retire this year but continue doing some teaching, and will combine his interests in organizational, group, and individual behavior by extending his consulting practice to family businesses. He and his wife also hope to travel more, including visits to children and eight grandchildren.
1954
Armand "Ding" Beaudoin reports that he lives on the south shore of Chesapeake Bay and is working for United Technologies Services, a company that cleans navy ships. ("They get real dirty," he says.) He is also a partner in a firm that specializes in computer protection and anti-theft devices. "Fortunately, Inge Moeller Hess '54 lives near here in Yorktown, VA, and keeps me up to date on Alfred activities. I cook and sip a little, they eat and sip a little, so everyone is happy."
Harrison "Dave" Woodin retired in 1994 from Instrumentation Service, Inc., which he owned, and since then has been dividing his time between Reno, where he lives, and Washington, where his wife, Terry Stern Woodin '54, works for the National Science Foundation. He says, "I am a volunteer at George Washington University ceramic department, and keep all their equipment in working order. Because I enjoy ceramics so much, I applied for graduate school at GWU. Last year I had the opportunity to spend October in Japan while my wife was on assignment in Nagano, Tokyo, and Sapporo. I put my Japanese rail pass to good use and spent my time going to museums and famous kiln sites, plus as many shrines as possible."
1995
Michael Birmingham graduated in May from AU's College of Business with a focus on management information systems. His wife, Kimberly Carroll Birmingham '96, graduated the same day with a Psy.D. degree. Her dissertation on the creation of a new math assessment tool for ninth grade is scheduled to be published by Herrick Library. In the fall, she will be working at Dansville Middle School as the district school psychologist.
Deaths - Alumni
Clifford H. Button, husband of one Alfred University alumna (Ruth Fuller Button '26, who died in 1982) and father of another Beverly Button Erickson '49), died Jan. 6, 2001, after a long illness. Born April 14, 1902, he was until his death the oldest living member of both the Christian Temple Church of Wellsville, NY, and Wellsville Masonic Lodge 230. After graduating from AU with an engineering degree, he worked several years in New York City, but he soon returned to Wellsville, where he was a building contractor for many years. In 1966, he developed the area near Belmont now known as Amity Lake.