Class Notes
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The Class Notes are the most popular section in the Alfred Magazine. For your convenience and reference, we offer these online Class Notes from past issues of the Magazine. As always, please forward any information to your class correspondents or to the Office of Communications at 607.871.2103 or via email. Check back as more Class Notes go online.

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2005/01/06 article in The Alfred Sun - A select group pf America's teachers are being honored by their toughest critics - their former students - in the eighth edition of Who's Who Among America's Teachers. Adel has been selected as one of the teachers'.
5/17/05 Dick married Brenda Ferrier on May 5, 2005 at 5:55 pm somwhere in Indiana. This was also her birthday.(sgh) 3/13/05 Dick recently became engaged to Brenda Ferrier.
Elmira Star Gazette "Boomers are heading toward retirement, and they want a few changes" Experts on aging, such as Robert Maiden, professor of psychology and director of the gerontology program at Alfred University, say the growth of the elderly population is only the beginning of a massive wave of aging. "About 78 million baby boomers are coming through," Maiden said. The oldest of the baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, will turn 60 next year (2006)
Black Enterprise Magazine - "Small Libraries, Big Technology" - Gary Roberts new column, Computers in Small Libraries, will speak to "typical" libraries and how staff in these institutions can leverage information technology on a modest budget, with a small (but enthusiastic) staff, and a clear vision for development. I believe even the smallest libraries have vast IT resources that are underutilized; their librarians just need encouragement and information to fully realize their institutions' potential. Gary is an information systems and reference librarian at Herrick Library, Alfred University. his responsibilities include overseeing reference, ILL, Web services, and most other technologies in a small library. In 2004, he received the 21st Century New Librarian Award.
Article in The Wellsville Daily Reporter - "Women in Politics Meet"
Article - "Programmers bypass Red Hat Linux fees" - Parsley states "Freedom from bureaucracy is one of the reasons why I founded Tau Linux. "It's always easier to pop a DVD into the drive to install it and nor register and not do any paperwork, It's like the old days of Linux--just install and go."
Article "Division III Convention Notes" The end of the Convention also marked the end of terms for six other Management Council members: one of them being Karen Johnson, director of institutional research at Alfred University.
Northampton - The new engineering program at Smith College has a new director. Linda E. Jones of AU will join the women's college July 1. She succeeds Domenico Grasso, who left the position a year ago to become dean of the school of engineering at the University of Vermont.
Dr. Irene Moszer appointed at AU to replace Rausch. - Dr. Moszer of Portland, OR will be the next vice president for Business and Finance for AU The Portland Ore residentwho will be moving to the Alfred area, will be the university's chief financial officer. She was vice president of finance and administration and chief financial officer for Pacific University in Forest Grove, Ore.
AU biology professor recognized as "promising young scientist" - Wellsville native to receive award - Dr. Lisa M. Flick, assistant professor of biology at AU, is one of 10 young faculty members at institutions across New York State to receive a James D. Watson Young Investigator Award for biotechnology. (Full article in her folder)
Ceramic artist Sara Ransford is exhibiting her work at the Red Brick Center for the Arts. Sara Ransford's ceramic sculptures are inspired by the passing of time, and the natural shapes two places she frequents: the sea and the desert. Perhaps most intriguing about the pieces is how they draw viewers for a closer look. While most sculpture is one solid chunk best observed from distance, Ransford's forms have nooks and crevasses that reward close-up inspection.
Sun Microsystems Announces Chief Scientist Bill Joy to Leave Company - Santa Clara, Calif Sept. 9, 2003 Sun Microsystems today announced that Co Founder and Chief Scientist, Bill Joy, is leaving Sun. Joy joined Sun Microsystems in 1982, the year of its inception. Most recently he has served as the company's chief scientist. Joy's responsibilities will transition to Greg Papadopoulos, chief technology officer and executive vice president, Sun Microsystems.
Dr. William Hall of Alfred, interim vice president for academic affairs and provost of AU, was sworn in Monday as the new Allegany County legislature for District 5. He was appointed by the Legislature to fill a vacancy created by the resignation of Dr. Robert Heineman, professor of political science at AU.
"This may be old news and isn't really confined to the class of '52. I received word recently that Ellsworth Barnard, for nine years chair of the English Department at Alfred, and always known as Dutch or Dutchy, and his wife, Mary, both died during the past year. The word came from their nephew who said that Dutch's final book, a selection of his lectures, was published after his death. For information contact Nelson Jaquay at 456 Rt. 140, Tinmouth, VT 05773, or call (802) 446-2367. Dutch was at Alfred in the '40s and early '50s and in his four-volume autobiography said those were the happiest years of his life, even though his salary was only $2,500 a year. (Yes, a year, not a month.) Why Dutchy resigned from the Alfred faculty was a mystery to most of his students, but he told the full story years later in his autobiography. He left in a dispute with the president at the time, M. Ellis Drake, a quarrel involving what Dutchy perceived as racism and incompetence on Dr. Drake's part.
1935
Marge Armant Kerns reports from Fayetteville, PA, that her youngest great granddaughter, Heather L. Barnes, graduated from high school in May, and has been interested in art on the college level. "Who in the classes near '37 remembers Georgia Grow and Jack Merriam, and St. Pat's? Great living to all. Ever forward we will strive, AU '35."
1937
From Rich Simington: "A a world traveler, Howard T. 'Ted' Knapp is in a league of his own. Over the years he has been in 178 different countries. As he says, if you count how many of them have split into smaller countries the number is closer to 200. He also has a museum-quality collection of historic military arms, including six full sets of armor. Today Ted stays closer to home in Orange City, FL."
"When Ellen Oliver came to Alfred she learned to play bridge in the dorm," Rich found out. "And she liked it because she's been playing for 75 years. However, she says she's semi-retired from bridge. For the past two years she's cut back from five times a week to twice a week. By the way, if you want to hear an interesting story, ask Ellen how she came to be the only known widow with two husbands in the Steuben County, NY, Hall of Fame. Ellen lives in Canandaigua, NY."
1938
Nelda Randall Creagh reports she's "still active at 89." Nelda taught high school English "in and around Baltimore County for some 50 years," and earned a master of arts degree in English from American University, Washington, DC.
"In Florida, this year the hottest spring training ticket was to see the World Champion Boston Red Sox," says Rich. "Samuel (Sam) Sverdlik figured it wasn't even worth going to the park to try to get a seat. One day his neighbor asked him if he had ever been in the military because the local American Legion needed volunteers for a project. Sam proved he was a veteran by showing his Purple Heart decoration. The first project the new member worked on was selling hot dogs at the American Legion booth at the stadium where the Red Sox were playing! Sam reads the box scores in Ft. Myers, FL."
1939
"Robert Perry was highly thought of as a ceramic engineer during his working career, as signified by his election to the presidency of the NYS Ceramic Society," says Rich Simington. "But his fame spread more widely after his retirement. He volunteered to serve two stints in Thailand with the International Executives Association. Then he made 15 trips in three years as a consultant in South America. And he's a veteran of tourist cruises. Today, his wanderlust satisfied, Bob spends time closer to home in Canandaigua, NY."
1940
From Rich Simington: "Some people really like to play bridge. Like Mildred Haerter Pape. For many years she was happy to enjoy games with many friends in her neighborhood who had a regular schedule for gathering at each others' homes. But then the friends began to move away and they weren't replaced by bridge players. So Millie took matters into her own hands. She moved to one of the largest retirement communities in her area. And today, Millie can play bridge every day if she wants. Millie is happy again in Bradenton, FL.
Charles Casamo writes: "As times fly by, we continue to think back to the many good days at Alfred. We (wife Beulah) are lucky to have had 60 years of married bliss and still enjoy being able to travel, especially to our summer home in the North Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains from our regular home in St. Pete Beach, FL. Best wishes to all classmates in and near the class of '40."
1941
Classmate Esther M. Tuttle, 85, wife of the late Professor Emeritus Milton A. Tuttle, '41, died June 4, 2005. Esther received her bachelor's and master's degrees in ceramic engineering from the College of Ceramics. She earned her doctorate in ceramic engineering with a minor in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, where she was the second woman to ever earn a doctorate and the first woman to earn one in ceramic engineering. Highlights of her working career included three years as a spectroscopist for the State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Portland, OR; three years as a research associate and project director at the North Carolina State Experimental Station, Raleigh, NC; 10 years in her privately owned petrographic lab; four years as a visiting professor of spectroscopy at the College of Ceramics; and finally, when she was 65, she taught two years of digital electronics at Alfred State College. She is survived by a daughter, Amy (David) Hoelzer, '79, of Oak Ridge, TN; two sons, Bruce (Evelyn) Tuttle, '69, of Albuquerque, NM, and John (Steffani) Tuttle of Douglasville, GA; five grandchildren; five nieces; and seven nephews.
"Jack and Peggy Tuttle still tell different stories of how they met," reports Rich Simington. "He was in the service, home on leave, and 'looked up his old Alfred pals, especially Peggy,' says Jack. 'He came to visit my sister,' says Peggy. They agree they went to a movie, though neither remembers which one. And they fell in love, quickly. Today they continue to live in the house they bought in Webster, NY, when his military service was over. One room is devoted to quilting by members of a club to which Peggy belongs. Jack is a devoted driver for Meals on Wheels."
"Jack and Peggy Tuttle still tell different stories of how they met," reports Rich Simington. "He was in the service, home on leave, and 'looked up his old Alfred pals, especially Peggy,' says Jack. 'He came to visit my sister,' says Peggy. They agree they went to a movie, though neither remembers which one. And they fell in love, quickly. Today they continue to live in the house they bought in Webster, NY, when his military service was over. One room is devoted to quilting by members of a club to which Peggy belongs. Jack is a devoted driver for Meals on Wheels."
Word has been received that Grant E. Tucker died on Jan. 24, 2005. He is survived by his wife, Jane Uffert Tucker, '40.
"We were saddened to hear that Jane Bray Humphrey lost her husband, Bob Humphrey '41, in late February 2005. We first heard the news from Col. Larry March, '45, during one of our frequent phone conversations. I sent a personal note to Jane to her home in Wilbraham, MA, and as class correspondent expressed sympathy from all '43 alumni. We understand that the Humphreys spent a share of the winter months in Sebring, FL. While there, they usually attended the annual reunions of the Florida west coast Alfred alumni, held at the Bird Key Yacht Club in Sarasota in early March.
1942
"I was prompted to get in touch with Betty Stangl Thomas, '42M, as we had lost contact after she moved to her new residence. On March 12, I succeeded in reaching her. Betty lives in Sarasota and is an avid supporter of the local AU alumni group, and has attended 23 of the 34 meetings that have been held! For most of the 23 meetings, she was accompanied by her late husband Dave Thomas, '40. They had a long and happy marriage which lasted more than 60 years, I believe.
From our class correspondent: "Word by e-mail from Ann Petri, wife of Bill "Art" Petri, says Bill is busy repairing antique clocks. The tools needed are very specialized and he doesn't own most of them so he takes a clock repair class one night a week where he has access to what he needs. Bill has something in common with another classmate of ours, Bill "Hooker" Lowe, in Pougkeepsie, NY. Ann also writes of the 45-minute slide presentation she gives on the book she has written, "Cherokee Tears," and has offered to present it to your class correspondent's retirement complex here in Sarasota. Also, your class correspondent has purchased the book from Barnes and Noble.
From Bill Crandall: "Because we live in Port Charlotte, FL, we had a visit from Charley on Aug. 13, 2004." (Editor's note: We assume he meant the hurricane, not AU President Charley Edmondson.) Bill was in Swain, NY, with his wife at the time, spending three months there since Bill sold his house in Alfred several months ago. They contacted a friend by phone who lived far enough out of the path of Charley. "He made a visit to our house and reported that we had lost some shingles from the roof and there were limbs down in our yard, and our house seemed safe." Bill and his wife decided to go on with their plans to visit Eastern Europe instead of returning to Florida right away. They cruised the Blue Danube, seeing many castles and old palaces. The highlight of the tour was a concert in St. Stephen's Cathedral, Passau, Germany. The concert was played on the largest church organ in the world - 17,974 pipes, 233 stops, and four carillons
Classmate Esther M. Tuttle, 85, wife of the late Professor Emeritus Milton A. Tuttle, '41, died June 4, 2005. Esther received her bachelor's and master's degrees in ceramic engineering from the College of Ceramics. She earned her doctorate in ceramic engineering with a minor in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, where she was the second woman to ever earn a doctorate and the first woman to earn one in ceramic engineering. Highlights of her working career included three years as a spectroscopist for the State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries, Portland, OR; three years as a research associate and project director at the North Carolina State Experimental Station, Raleigh, NC; 10 years in her privately owned petrographic lab; four years as a visiting professor of spectroscopy at the College of Ceramics; and finally, when she was 65, she taught two years of digital electronics at Alfred State College. She is survived by a daughter, Amy (David) Hoelzer, '79, of Oak Ridge, TN; two sons, Bruce (Evelyn) Tuttle, '69, of Albuquerque, NM, and John (Steffani) Tuttle of Douglasville, GA; five grandchildren; five nieces; and seven nephews.
1943
From your class correspondent: "In mid-February 2005, Ellis 'Chick' Berger and his daughter Muff ventured from their home in Fishkill, NY, to New York City, to experience what thousands of others were doing, i.e., walking through 'The Gates' in Central Park. Chick sent us an enthusiastic letter and included several excellent photos and a colorful clipping from the front page of The New York Times for Feb. 13, 2005. Chick said he and Muff were mesmerized by the scope and beauty of the project. Some of Chick's photos were taken from the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and showed the meandering walkways with the brilliant panels billowing in the breeze. The panels seemed to become a dynamic living part of the park. However, like all of the previous artwork of the Christos, the most famous of which is probably 'Wrapped Reichstag' in 1995, 'The Gates' was a temporary display, starting on Feb. 12, 2005, and lasting only 16 days. Am sure many share my feelings that the ephemeral aspect of the project added to its appeal. Don't we remember beautiful but temporary sights, sounds, and sensations long after they cease to exist? The entire expense of the materials used and the building and dismantling of the artwork was borne by the Christos. We wonder what their next ambitious, large scale, temporary project will be.
"Isabel Riggs Geibel phoned on Feb. 23, 2005, to tell us she had just received her copy of the February issue of AU People, and was enjoying reading your correspondent's l-o-n-g class notes column. (This one thankfully will be shorter). Isabel is keeping busy, as always. Recently, she was privileged to see Hal Holbrook's highly acclaimed interpretation of Mark Twain. She was looking forward to attending Bill Cosby's solo presentation of his tenets and philosophy, always funny, to be sure, but not without controversy.
"My thanks to Rich Simington for his addendum to my last notes regarding Benny Soldano. Loyal contributor Bob Sinclair e-mailed us that he still remembers Benny's playing the piano by ear in Davis Gym for hours! Both of them were in the U.S. Navy Reserve, attended midshipman's school together, and ended up in the same class. Bob reports they've been in contact and plan to be in Alfred for reunion weekend this year. What a great time they'll have reminiscing and exchanging life stories!
"We were saddened to hear that Jane Bray Humphrey lost her husband, Bob Humphrey '41, in late February 2005. We first heard the news from Col. Larry March, '45, during one of our frequent phone conversations. I sent a personal note to Jane to her home in Wilbraham, MA, and as class correspondent expressed sympathy from all '43 alumni. We understand that the Humphreys spent a share of the winter months in Sebring, FL. While there, they usually attended the annual reunions of the Florida west coast Alfred alumni, held at the Bird Key Yacht Club in Sarasota in early March.
"On March 28, we received a phone call, the least welcome of any. It was from Elin Johnston, the sister of Mary Johnston Lawrence, our dear classmate, who passed away the 19th of March. Is there any one of us who has anything but treasured memories of Mary? She was a special person, genuine, without affectation. She and husband 'Lucky' (Walter Lawrence, '47) were ideally suited. Sadly, she lost him several years ago. Now she can be with him and their short-lived son, for all time.
Rhoda Ungar Merriman "Dodo" Jost resides in Ottawa Hills, OH.
Rich Simington wishes "all of us could arrange our retirement to be as productive and enjoyable as J. David Broudo has. As the founder of the art program at Endicott College, in his career he had to spend a lot more time on professorial and administrative tasks than on his first love, creating art. Now that he's a professor emeritus, he doesn't have to grade student work or organize the responsibilities of others in the art program. But he can create to his heart's content. The most recent exhibition of Dave's work was "Paintings of the Inner Eye," this spring at Mingo Gallery, in the town where Dave and his wife, Barbara, continue to live, Beverly, MA.
"We're happy to report that in late March we received a long letter and several digital pictures from Guy Hartman , MD, and his wife Shirley Baldwin Hartman, '45, who live in Salt Lake City, UT. Guy is another eminently successful member of our class, having had a long and distinguished career in areas of pediatric medicine and music. He retired from medical practice in 1987 and resigned from USC, where he had served 30 years as clinical professor of pediatrics. Guy sought out his first love, music, and renewed his expertise with the organ. In September 1996, his interest took him to visit the historic pipe organs of several European countries. For several years he was supervisor of organists at the SLC Temple, and played as a regular and substitute organist. Now with his activities curtailed, Shirley writes, 'Guy reads endlessly books and papers where his interests lie.' The two of them have season's tickets to the opera and ballet, and enjoy a study group of friends, as well as church activities. The Hartmans have two sons and three daughters. Eric and Peter are taking advantage of the building boom; Eric, in a precision machine shop, and Peter, as a contractor. Daughter Fenn is a high school teacher with many years' experience. Christina (Tina) still sings with the Oregon Bach Festival Chorus and the New York Dessoff Choir. She was thrilled to be part of the choir for the dedication of the Manhattan Temple. One of Tina's sons is enrolled at Alfred University to study glass technology, much to Guy and Shirley's delight. Their youngest daughter Juliana (Julie) and her family live in California, where she and her husband, who studied at Julliard, are also involved in musical pursuits. Music has been such a compelling influence with so many in the Hartman family, Guy and Shirley feel rewarded for this apparently inherited talent and all of God's blessings through the years.
1945
Jean Gardner Brady lives in Wellsville, NY; she has five children.
From Rich Simington: "When Harriet Norton Fisk's husband, Charles, retired as an Air Force bomber pilot, she went back to college earning a master's degree and then taught business for 20 years. Eventually they both retired and decided they had been home long enough. They traveled to all 50 states, eastern and western Canada, England, and Australia (twice). Now they're enjoying spending more time at home in Venice, FL, socializing with the neighbors in a community where Charles has earned a reputation as the man 'who knows how to fix anything.'"
"Most people who know C. Laurin (Larry) March think of him as an accomplished fighter pilot and career Air Force officer," says Rich. "But his wife Eddy knows Larry is a dyed-in-the-wool romantic. You'll agree if you ask her to tell the story of their first (blind) date. It includes a New Year's Eve noisemaker and a cigar ring and is guaranteed to make you smile. Larry and Eddy live in Seminole, FL."
"We're happy to report that in late March we received a long letter and several digital pictures from Guy Hartman , MD, and his wife Shirley Baldwin Hartman, '45, who live in Salt Lake City, UT. Guy is another eminently successful member of our class, having had a long and distinguished career in areas of pediatric medicine and music. He retired from medical practice in 1987 and resigned from USC, where he had served 30 years as clinical professor of pediatrics. Guy sought out his first love, music, and renewed his expertise with the organ. In September 1996, his interest took him to visit the historic pipe organs of several European countries. For several years he was supervisor of organists at the SLC Temple, and played as a regular and substitute organist. Now with his activities curtailed, Shirley writes, 'Guy reads endlessly books and papers where his interests lie.' The two of them have season's tickets to the opera and ballet, and enjoy a study group of friends, as well as church activities. The Hartmans have two sons and three daughters. Eric and Peter are taking advantage of the building boom; Eric, in a precision machine shop, and Peter, as a contractor. Daughter Fenn is a high school teacher with many years' experience. Christina (Tina) still sings with the Oregon Bach Festival Chorus and the New York Dessoff Choir. She was thrilled to be part of the choir for the dedication of the Manhattan Temple. One of Tina's sons is enrolled at Alfred University to study glass technology, much to Guy and Shirley's delight. Their youngest daughter Juliana (Julie) and her family live in California, where she and her husband, who studied at Julliard, are also involved in musical pursuits. Music has been such a compelling influence with so many in the Hartman family, Guy and Shirley feel rewarded for this apparently inherited talent and all of God's blessings through the years.
1946
"Works by 11 Artists to be Shown at New Artist Owned Gallery" Artist owned ARTAMO LLC is proud to announce the opening of ARTAMO Gallery, the new contemporary art destination in Santa Barbara. Pat Kenny, born 1924, noted award-winning artist Pat Kenny, also known as Pat Lopez, has a long and distinguished career in ceramics. Pat Kenny was educated at AU (at that time the only ceramics college in the US) and was apprenticed to the famous Viennese Art Deco Sculptor Vally Wieselthier when a teenager. In the 40's and 50's she participated in the great changes in ceramic art. Pat Kenny always takes special pride in carefully developing and producing her own one of a kind glazes. Because of hand injuries she had to stop all ceramic work for a long period but now she is back, better than ever, with new ideas, exciting concepts, and daring tecniques. Today Pat works in her studio in Santa Barbara, CA
1947
From Rich Simington: "If you had to pick a word to describe C. Alan Lindquist you might pick 'meticulous.' He has documentation of hundreds of publications and honors he received during his accomplished career as an engineer. But if you didn't know about his engineering, you'd probably guess he was a professor of English because of his love of language and charming way of spinning stories to illustrate how he has compiled a mental encyclopedia of the vagaries of how confusing our language is. And while you're at it, ask him why his nickname is 'Toad.' Today Al spins his stories to a wide circle of friends in Orange City, FL.
"When Haldred 'Hal' Breckon isn't helping out at the local Presbyterian church, or performing good works with his fellow Masons, he's a regular in a golf league with lots of retirees from the former Hooker Chemical. But like most engineers, Hal's a numbers guy. So after each outing, he goes home to his computer and recalculates the handicap of all the league members. Hal continues to live in Youngstown, NY."
"Most of us think we're logical planners but it's amazing how many directions life can lead," says Rich. "Gladys Heebner, for instance, came to Alfred to study languages and left with a degree in nursing. Her career seemed to concentrate in the New York metropolitan area (Nassau County, Brooklyn, Connecticut). That is until she moved to Texas with the Veterans Administration. And even that could have been atypical, until she took a nursing job for several years in Saudi Arabia, when most of us couldn't say which continent it was on. Today Gladys lives in Largo, FL. And she does little or no nursing these days. She's too busy as a lay pastor at Christ Presbyterian Church."
1948
Rich reports: "For most of us, the devastation of the hurricane season in Florida is a fading memory. Not for Tom McNeill. Months after the ravaging storms blew through, he is still waiting to find a contractor with an opening in the schedule to talk about beginning to repair his damaged home. Tom and his wife Suzanne live in Orlando, FL."
"Raymond Scholts has moved back East after 24 years in the West. He was originally from Rochester, NY. He and his wife Helen now reside at 150 Waugh Ave., New Wilmington, PA 16142, in an apartment for retirees on the Westminster College campus. He admits to taking a few classes but "don't take any 10-minute quizzes." Class of '49, he would like to hear from you."
Janet Matson Hillman is retired and living in Greenville, RI. "In the past year I have kept pretty active -- one essay published in The Vintage Voice, one poem in Invoking the Muse. "I am currently sanding and decorating wooden shingles and have sold some. My grandchildren (all nine) have reached college age and I hope one of them will consider Alfred. Would love to hear from some old Theta friends."
Marie Cherichetti is retired, residing in Stratham, NH.
From Rich Simington: "Donald and Miriam Tooke Polan loved their Florida home. It had just the right number of rooms with exactly the conveniences they wanted, and best of all was their beloved swimming pool, used daily. But it was too big. It required too much care. So they found a clever solution. They moved nearby to a home with the same number of rooms, the same conveniences, and of course, a swimming pool. But this home is two-thirds the size of the former one. Today Don and Mimi live happily in their new smaller home in DeLand, FL.
From Rich Simington: "Donald and Miriam Tooke Polan loved their Florida home. It had just the right number of rooms with exactly the conveniences they wanted, and best of all was their beloved swimming pool, used daily. But it was too big. It required too much care. So they found a clever solution. They moved nearby to a home with the same number of rooms, the same conveniences, and of course, a swimming pool. But this home is two-thirds the size of the former one. Today Don and Mimi live happily in their new smaller home in DeLand, FL.
"Since having both hips replaced, Carl Hagberg has finally given up skiing," says Rich. "But gardening is another matter. This spring you could find Carl on his knees digging and pruning plants all around his home. And what does a gardener do when it's too cold to garden? Well, this past year Carl took his children for a family vacation in London and they all sailed home on the new Queen Mary 2. Carl continues to garden in Jamestown, NY."
1949
In April 2005, Professor Hermine Plotnick was invited to Long Beach California where she was honored for 50 years of membership in the American Occupational Therapy Association. More recently, on June 20, she was keynote speaker at LaGuardia Community College for the 30th anniversary of the first graduating class of the Department of Occupational Therapy. Professor Plotnick was the founding director of the program. She also founded the Department of Occupational Therapy at York College. Both are colleges within the City University of New York. Currently, Professor Plotnick is founding director and chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, New York Institute of Technology.
Rich Simington recently visited Robert C. Turner, professor emeritus of ceramic art, and his wife, Sue, in Sandy Spring, MD, and came back with this story: "Recently, a retired men's group near Bob's house needed a speaker for its program and invited Bob. It's likely they thought that inviting one of America's storied ceramic artists would provide a morning of discussion of aesthetic values, or perhaps insights into artistic inspiration, or maybe inside tips on how a renowned ceramic artist accomplishes what most of us can't. Nope. They heard about birds. And in particular, birds' memories. It seems Bob had been interested recently in some readings he had been doing about how some varieties of birds can hide food in as many as 2,500 caches and remember each location. What the men's group may have learned is how much of creativity starts with curiosity."
"We know quite a few people who met their future spouses at Alfred," says Rich, "but Leonard Gold knew a cute girl when he saw one - and he didn't even wait until Shirley Bernstein, '50, got to campus to begin her freshman year to try to make an impression. The way Len tells it, he and Shirley were on the pier in Manhattan, waiting for the ferry to take them across the Hudson River to catch the train that would eventually bring them to Alfred. Len noticed that Shirley said goodbye to her boyfriend, and wasted no time sidling up to her to begin telling her the ins and outs of AU. She must have been impressed because no one knows where the old boyfriend went, and Len and Shirley are still going strong. They now live in Pembroke Pines, FL."
1950
"We know quite a few people who met their future spouses at Alfred," says Rich, "but Leonard Gold knew a cute girl when he saw one - and he didn't even wait until Shirley Bernstein, '50, got to campus to begin her freshman year to try to make an impression. The way Len tells it, he and Shirley were on the pier in Manhattan, waiting for the ferry to take them across the Hudson River to catch the train that would eventually bring them to Alfred. Len noticed that Shirley said goodbye to her boyfriend, and wasted no time sidling up to her to begin telling her the ins and outs of AU. She must have been impressed because no one knows where the old boyfriend went, and Len and Shirley are still going strong. They now live in Pembroke Pines, FL."
Beverly Burnett Opalka is a homemaker in Portland, ME.
The news of the death of William Chorney, Stevens Point, WI, was greatly exaggerated as reported in the last Alfred Magazine. He phoned in to say he is very alive and very well.
Class of '50, William E. Pitney, died on May 25, 2005, in Salisbury, CT. Mr. Pitney dedicated his life and love to the world of ceramics. From 1953-75 he taught ceramics at Wayne State University, Detroit. He was one of the founders of the Michigan Ceramic Art Association. In 1990, he was awarded the Excellence in Teaching Award in Tucson, AZ. In 1993, he received the master craftsman award from the Society for Connecticut Crafts. His ceramics are displayed in art galleries throughout the United States.
Marie Jova Campbell, Novato, CA, is pleased with the proposal of the Theta Memorial Scholarship but says it is "too bad to see the old house go -- many good memories."
From Rich Simington: "When John Riggs came to Alfred he seemed like just another local kid who lived in Wellsville while he finished his degree. Wrong. Though John did live in Wellsville during those years, he had spent most of his childhood in Argentina, where his dad was an engineer. Then after graduation he created a distinguished career as a Kodak executive. So what's so unusual about Rochester, NY? Well, like in his childhood, John's career wasn't locally focused. Early in his career he lived in Brazil and went on to direct Kodak operations in Central and South America, Asia, India and the Pacific, and Europe. Not bad for a kid from Wellsville, er Argentina. John and his wife, Elizabeth, live in New Smyrna Beach, FL.
"When Thomas 'Tom' Mitchell was at Alfred, he was a pretty good tennis and badminton player," say Rich. "He says he still is. And at Alfred his pal, Fred Carlson, '50, taught him to sail. He still does that too. And he also powerboats with his son-in-law. So what does he do in the winter? He's a skier. At two different slopes around Jamestown, NY, where he continues to live. He's apparently passed his athleticism along to his high-school-age granddaughter. She's attended Alfred's basketball camp two summers in a row."
From Rich Simington: "Roger Gentsch has become one of the town of Poolesville, MD's foremost local historians. Roger volunteers to bring to life for tourists an old log structure in Poolesville. He tells stories about what life was like in the early days when the log structure was first built. Or he can tell you some pretty interesting yarns about Civil War Confederate raiders called the Commandos, who used to quietly sneak out of Virginia, ford the Potomac River at places only they knew about and launch guerrilla attacks against the Union troops who thought they were protected. Or you can ask Roger about the distinctive whitewashed building on the town center triangle. He knows a lot of good stories.
"Emily Worth Robinson, former class correspondent, and her husband, Richard, '50, are not traveling overseas this year as is their custom. Instead they'll attend two high school graduations, one college graduation, and the wedding of their oldest grandson in South Carolina. They'll also spend a week in their time-share in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia and a week at Ocean City, MD. Coming in July will be their family reunion in New Hampshire which will attract some 50 or 60 relatives. Emily is editing a yearbook for the occasion and heads a committee at her church that is compiling a history of the 120-year-old congregation.
Article - "University to honor bloodstain expert" -Herbert MacDonell, whose pioneering work made bloodstain pattern interpretation an integral part of criminal investigation, will be honored Jan 29 by the University of Rhode Island Alumni Association.
1951
"A. William Clark's a bachelor, and if you spend much time with him," says Rich, "you might want to be a bachelor too. He's arranged his home the way he likes it. His art creations from a lifetime career as an artist/educator are on display around a gallery-sized room with a high ceiling. He's a longtime Audubon Society member and lives in a rural area with plentiful, extravagant birds. When asked what he likes to paint most, his honest answer is, 'women.' And when asked what he likes to do when he isn't painting, his response often is 'date women.' Bill enjoys life in Homosassa, FL.
"When Burt Valvo graduated from Alfred he went into sales," Rich tells us. "For 10 years, he sold a variety of products, including snacks. In fact, his wife still says, 'I don't know why Burt went to law school. He was a cracker jack salesman!' But he did go to law school and opened a practice in his hometown. He must have been good at it because by the time he retired he had been an attorney a lot longer than he was a salesman. I guess you could say he was a 'cracker jack' attorney. Burt and his wife, Jean, continue to live in Dunkirk, NY."
Alan W. Pike died Aug. 15, 2004, in Syracuse, NY, after a long battle with cancer. After graduating from AU, he served with the U.S. Army in combat during the Korean War. On completion of a master's degree in social work at Adelphia University, he became an executive in research and planning in mental health in Suffolk County. Later, he continued this work with the NYS Department of Health, Albany. He was clerk of the Syracuse Society of Friends Meeting for many years and participated in the Philadelphia Yearly Meetings. He was active in many peace and social action movements. A Quaker memorial meeting was held in September 2004 in Baldwinsville, NY. He is survived by his spouse of 49 years, Joyce Haimes Pike; a son, Charles A. Pike; daughters Anne Imperial and Abby Corey; sisters Jane Conklin and Susan Pike Normoyle, '49; and four grandchildren.
1952
Wilbur Wakely, who signs his message 'from sunny San Diego,' says that after retiring from two ceramics companies he founded he tried his hand (lungs?) at glass blowing and finds it the most demanding art form he has ever tried. Not content with his own work, he has started a collection of glass created by other artists. His wife, Nancy, died two years ago and he has met a 'compatible widow.' They have remodeled his house and now have time to enjoy theater, travel, and computers. He adds, 'On a recent cruise to Maui, I ran into Wayne Husted, '52, selling small glass baubles at a sidewalk stall.'
"Marjorie (Bard) McNamee, when she worked for Eastern Airlines, traveled the world picking up orphans to deliver to the adopting parents. Now, she says, 'I'm not going anywhere and am doing nothing exciting.' She is enthused, however, about her Honda hybrid car and recommends gas/electric cars to everyone.
"Don Boulton reported in mid-May that he had just returned from a consulting visit to St. Andrews University, Scotland, where he, as usual, took out his golf clubs on that famed course. The weather was cold and rainy, he noted, but isn't that what Scotland usually offers? Between rounds he met with university faculty to discuss peer review of teaching, recruitment of American students, and fund raising. He also got a glimpse of Prince Andrew. At the end of the visit he celebrated the 60th anniversary of VE Day at Westminster Abbey and a show in Trafalgar Square.
"Russell Wood denies having any news except to say that he travels to California from his home in Pennsylvania two or three times a year to visit his daughter and son-in-law and 4-year-old grandson.
"Emily Worth Robinson, former class correspondent, and her husband, Richard, '50, are not traveling overseas this year as is their custom. Instead they'll attend two high school graduations, one college graduation, and the wedding of their oldest grandson in South Carolina. They'll also spend a week in their time-share in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia and a week at Ocean City, MD. Coming in July will be their family reunion in New Hampshire which will attract some 50 or 60 relatives. Emily is editing a yearbook for the occasion and heads a committee at her church that is compiling a history of the 120-year-old congregation.
"Bob Mangels says that at this year's Lambda Chi Alpha reunion at Pocono Manor, PA, he will be joined by Jim Ridgeway, Gordon Shippy, Millie Stubbs, Jean and Pete Riker, Ding Beaudoin and people from other classes. This will be the group's 26th get-together. As Bob says, 'Alfred was a bonding experience.'
"David Woodin denies that he is doing anything much of importance, but confesses that he spent last Thanksgiving in Porto, Portugal, Christmas in Barcelona, Spain, and in between was in Lisbon where he enjoyed inspecting the gorgeous tiles in museums and on buildings. He had the opportunity to visit because his wife was working for the U.S. Embassy in Lisbon and the consulates in the Azores. Dave says he does repair work for potters in the District of Columbia and at George Washington University and makes his own pottery at Lee Art Center, Arlington, VA.
"Ellison Patterson reports from Florida that he has been planting begonias and marigolds to replace the late and lamented pansies in his yard. He also is enjoying watching amateur softball and theater productions in his housing compound. Coming, he warned, is the Florida hurricane season.
"Brad Kinsman has good and bad news. The bad is that he had four coronary bypasses last August; but the good is that he is now 'doing great.' He comments, 'I had an aortic valve replacement with a pig's valve so have to put up with an 'oink' now and then and watch what pork I eat so it's not a valve relative.'
From Rich Simington: "Johnson "Bill" Wood has always been drawn to writers and writing. When he left Alfred University his first job was at a newspaper. So it should be no surprise that in his retirement in Florida he has continued to seek out writers as the president of the Tallahassee Writers Association and the founder of another community writers group. And he is no slouch as a writer himself. In fact, when Florida Gov. Jeb Bush wanted to honor veterans on the 40th anniversary of Pearl Harbor Day he asked for some writing help from Bill, who had been wounded twice as a machine gunner at the Battle of the Bulge. And Bill came through. He was honored to hear his own words read as part of the Governor's speech that day. Today Bill and his wife, Peg, live in Crawfordville, FL."
Jerome Ackerman and his wife, Evelyn, were featured in the Spring 2005 edition of Modernism magazine. Entitled "Design Duo Jerome and Evelyn Ackerman," the article reads in part: "Los Angeles-based designers Jerome and Evelyn Ackerman are one of the most prolific couples in the field of modern American decorative arts, and one of the most enduring: They started their careers together more than 50 years ago. Perhaps what distinguishes them most from other, better-known design couples, such as the Natzlers, Alberses, and Eameses, is their range. Best known for their ceramics, the Ackermans also created hand-woven, hand-hooked, and needle-point tapestries, mosaic panels and tables, molded metal and carved wood panels, plaques, and decorative hardware."
"Martin Moskof, who was leaving for Paris as he wrote (a 75th birthday present from his wife) said that he is planning to publish a novel called "Courage" by Alan Littell, '53, under Marty's imprint called Brillig. He said, 'I still can't believe I'm a publisher after just designing books my entire life.' He's also working on a book by Tom Spleth who taught in the School of Art & Design. Beyond publishing, Marty is about to rent some space in New York for making small sculptures and paintings.
"Al Baxter wrote, 'I'm a volunteer tutor for adults who cannot read or write and the experience has been rewarding. I was a C and D in freshman English and I keep hearing this whispering voice saying "I don't believe this Allen." I know it is Prof. Tupper.'
"B.J. (Amberg) Lawrence and her husband just returned home in May from a five-month tour that started along the East Coast which included a visit with Bill and Isabelle McMahon in Maryland. Then they went on to Texas, Arizona, Mexico, Nevada, and the national parks along the way. They ended up by watching their granddaughter graduate from the school of nursing at Cederville University.
"William McClurg wrote from Florida, but said he and his wife were on the way to Hilton Head. (Do we hear the rattle of golf clubs?) He said, 'I have finished the season as a counselor for the AARP income tax assistance program so we need a vacation. Retirement is so tough.' During the summer they'll sail to London on the Queen Mary II and spend a week in the city. Then it will be off to Sonoma, AZ; the Dells in Wisconsin, and somewhere unspecified in Tennessee. Other than that, he said, 'We will spend some time in Florida to see what the hurricanes are doing. Last summer Charlie missed us by 20 miles.'
"Edwin Pettengill, checking in from Stratford, CT, reported that he had just finished starring as Sky Masterson in "Guys and Dolls." His co-star, Sister Sarah, was his wife, Mae.
"Frank Bredell, your correspondent, and wife Jean Carnahan, took off for the South Pacific last winter for a three-week sojourn with an Elderhostel group in the Cook Islands and French Polynesia. What they failed to realize (but wouldn't have cared anyway) is that the Northern Hemisphere's winter is the rainy season in the South Pacific islands. Despite coping with an occasional deluge they counted themselves lucky. They weren't in the Cook Island restaurant when it was nearly destroyed by a cyclone a few weeks after they'd had dinner there. This spring they went on another tour to the eastern side of the Adriatic Sea, visiting Croatia and Slovenia. Why there? They'd never been to those countries.
1953
Carolyn Ann Smolarek, of Buffalo, NY, has owned her own condominium for the past 18 years, and after working many years as a decorator for a custom draperies business, retired and has her own business working out of the condo. She also taught quilting for a few years and now pursues it as a hobby, selling quilts to drapery clients and others. "Thanks to the four years in the ceramic design school I'm able to use all the skills I learned in college and have always kept my hand in the arts."
From Rich Simington: "Carol Dunham Sheets has always wanted to be a librarian but raising four children was a diversion. And working as an accountant paid more. She earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling because there was no university nearby offering a graduate degree in library science. But since she's semi-retired her dream is coming true. She heard of a town in Florida called Lake Placid. It was named by a Melville Dewey who had a summer home there. He lived in Lake Placid, NY. And oh yes, he was the inventor of the Dewey Decimal System. So it makes sense that this is the town where Carol lives. And what does she do there? She volunteers in the library, of course.
"If all you know of John Pearsall is his academic track record, he might look like a highly educated scholar of the humanities," says Rich. "At Alfred he was a history major. Later he earned an M.S. Ed. at Columbia, and then an M.L.S. But when he was in the Navy he was trained in something called 'machine accounting.' He took that skill and taught it to colleagues at Nabisco for many years. Then he moved to a position with the metro library system, Rochester, NY, and electronically linked the library systems of six neighboring communities. By then it was no longer machine accounting; it was called computer applications. Today, John is retired in Rochester and serves on the board of Mt. Hope Cemetery, where Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass are buried. He's responsible for overseeing the upkeep of almost 200 acres of gardens."
"Lyn (Byers) Hart also reports celebrating her 50th anniversary with her husband John '53. She says she spends her spare time teaching craft classes and gardening at their home south of Ocala, FL, and John challenges the golf course.
1954
(Editor's note: We goofed, and we owe an apology to Dr. Carleton Moore and his wife, Diane. In our report of gifts, we have them listed as members of the Boothe Colwell David Society, for those whose gifts are $9,999 or less. Carleton and Diane should have been listed in the J. Nelson Norwood Society, whose members have contributed $10,000 or more to AU in the last fiscal year.) Some of you may remember that Carleton delivered the Samuel R. Scholes Jr. Lecture in March 2004. His lecture was entitled "The Chemistry of Meteorites: Messengers from Time and Space," during which he discussed the different types of meteorites, their chemistry, and origin. He even brought samples, but he really didn't anticipate that a member of the audience would also show up with "meteorites" he wanted Carleton to analyze!
From Dee Levine: "How about a trip down Memory Lane.? Well, I had one today (May 26) when an old classmate, whom I had not seen since 1951, came to visit. Fifty-four years have passed since I last saw Lois Fierstein when we were freshmen at The Brick. A few months ago she located me via the Internet, and we have been corresponding ever since. It was such a trip to see her and we spent the afternoon poring over the yearbook and my 50th reunion memory book. Lots of laughs and a few tears. I encourage everyone to look up an old friend. It is a very touching experience."
Barbara Lee Bebarfald Newsome is retired in Santa Cruz, CA, but remains active playing tennis, bridge, gardening, and down-hill skiing.
Robert Kalfin directed the Keen Company revival of "Outward Bound" this spring at Urban Stages, New York City.
"Our deepest thanks and perennial gratitude to Dr. Marlin Miller, Jr., '54, and his wife Ginger Miller, for their magnificent gift to Alfred University. The potential of such generosity seems almost immeasurable. How we wish we could return in future years to see what wonders have been accomplished with it!
Hope Abrams Blonsky is a reading teacher in Miami, FL. She and husband Joe, '52, celebrated their 51st anniversary in June.
1956
Margery Sue Leonard, who attended Alfred from 1952-54 as a liberal arts major, and who was a member of Pi Alpha Pi sorority, died in January 2005 in Los Angeles, CA. She had worked in New York for Columbia Records with both Mitch Miller and Percy Faith. In Los Angeles, she was a production assistant for Alan J. Pakula and worked on many of his films including "All The President's Men." She will be missed.
Barbara Schwartz Kirsh was commissioned and executed a series of watercolors targeted at young children for Child Abuse Prevention Services (CAPS) in Roslyn, NY. CAPS presents educational programs in schools all over Long Island, NY, dealing with bully prevention, sexual harassment prevention, date rape, and child abuse. Barbara is also a volunteer for CAPS and addresses both student and parent groups.
Robert Littell has a new book out, "Legends: A Novel of Dissimulation," a post-Cold War spy novel. A review by John Updike appears in the June 13 & 20, 2005 edition of The New Yorker.
From Rich Simington: "It was fortunate for Alfred that Don Weaver, Sr.'s father was a talented entrepreneur. The business he started needed a ceramic engineer and Don came to Alfred to become one. Then he went home and eventually took over the business from his dad. During his stewardship, the business expanded 3,000-fold. And because Don needed another ceramic engineer, his son, Don Jr., '83, came to Alfred. Today he runs the family business. But now Alfred has a problem. Don Jr.'s son, Don III, is almost ready for college but he's a hockey phenom. He expects to play at the premier Junior A level next year. Without an intercollegiate hockey team, Alfred's string of Don Weavers in ceramic engineering may be in jeopardy. Don Sr. and his wife, Amy Koechling, '58, continue to live in Mayville, NY."
1957
Angela Zegarelli Van Derhoof is an administrator in Utica, NY.
Leonarda Van Der Werf resides in Aurora, CO. (Grandson Joshua graduated as valedictorian of his high school class May 20, 2005. Granddaughter Rebecca married on June 11, 2005.)
1958
Mary Inskip Summerhill is retired, living in Rockwood, TN. During her working years, she served as a cytotechnologist at various hospitals; taught art in grades two-nine; and was a social researcher.
Poet Marvin Bell is retiring from the faculty of the renowned University of Iowa Writers' Workshop after roughly four decades.
From Rich Simington: "Oh sure, J. Russell Fahey seems like a guy who has figured life out, with his painting, his guitar playing, and his scuba diving trips to Honduras. But if you want to hear about the real Fahey story, ask him to tell about the 13 years when he and his family lived on a 75-acre 'farm' in Weedsport, NY. There were two horses, two cows, a couple of pigs, and some ducks and chickens. All with names. And people in Weedsport still talk about the family that spent most of its free time chasing the animals who escaped. Russ and his wife, Pat, live with no farm animals in Daytona Beach, FL.
Joan Harnett Tallan of Reynoldsburg, OH, is a full-time artist/printmaker after 25 years' teaching high school art. The mother of four and grandmother of six is currently the Ohio Arts Council artist in education. "Life is good! Thank you Alfred for great preparation."
1959
"Congratulations Brenda Kaufman Monene on a new knee, and get well soon.
Carolyn M. Young Hess retired in 1998 after 30 years as a middle school art teacher. She has written a children's book, "A Cricket in a Christmas Tree," plays lots of golf, spends three months each year in Florida, and has been "married to the same wonderful man for 46 years." She lives in Pittsburgh, PA.
"Dr. L. David Pye, dean and professor of Glass Science, emeritus, at Alfred University, delivered the annual Samuel R. Scholes, Sr. Lecture in April on the history of glass science at AU. It was a fitting topic for Dave, who has been involved in the field of glass science for nearly five decades as a a teacher, scholar, and researcher. In addition to running a successful research program of his own, he was co-founder of the National Science Foundation Industry-University Center for Glass Research at Alfred University, and was instrumental in creating only the third Ph.D. program in the world in glass science. Because of his efforts and those of his colleagues, Alfred University has the only Ph.D. program in glass science in the United States.
"I had a mini reunion with my old friend Marty Stenzler and his wife, Barbara, at their home in Indian Wells, CA. What fun....Marty is exactly as we all remember him -- just in a different venue. Now he presides at the Indian Wells Country Club instead of the Alfred Campus. Ageless and obviously loved by all and doing his usual 'schtick.' It was great seeing him.
Linda Treiling DeMoss is retired and residing in Finksburg, MD.
"Mary Cavanaugh Graves was one of five inducted into the Greene County (Ohio) Women's Hall of Fame and honored for service to their communities and the county. Her induction was based on her public service in local government having served on the school board for 18 years, and serving on the Bellbrook City Council for the past 11 years. She has been mayor of Bellbrook for nine years. Congratulations Mary!
L. David Pye, dean of professor of glass science, emeritus at AU will deliver the 2005 Samuel R. Scholes Sr. Award Lecture at 11:20 am April 7 in Harder Hall's Holmes Auditorium. Pye's topic will be "History of Glass Science at Alfred University". the annual Samuel R. Scholes Sr. Award Lecture is presented each year to a distinguished glass scientist or engineer for hir or her contributions in the field. It is named for Samuel R. Scholes Sr. who founded the glass science programs at AU in 1932. After receiving his BS degree in ceramic engineering in 1959, Pye went on to earn both his masters and Ph.D. degrees, all from AU. His career has included working as a research engineer at PPG Industries and Bausch and Lomb, Inc. As a member of the AU faculty, Pye co-founded the NSF Industry-University Center for Glass Research, Paul Vickers Gardner Center for Glass and several continuing international conferences. He also established several scholarship funds, has received several awards and served as president of the International Commission on Glass. During his tenure as dean of the NYS College of Ceramics at AU, sponsored research rose to then record levels and several ne academic programs were initiated.
1960
Noel Reitmester, MBA, CFP, senior vice president-investment with the Merrillville, IN, office of A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc., recently qualified for Crest Club and President's Council, two of the firm's special recognition levels. Noel has been a financial consultant in the Merrillville office for 31 years.
In 2000, at age 62, Don Bolles retired from a four-man general law practice after 30 years in rural King City, CA. He has been listed in "Who's Who in America" and "Who's Who in American Law" for several years. He served as president of the Monterey College of Law in 2001. Currently, he is president of his homeowners association in Corral de Tierra, CA, board member of Legal Services for Seniors, and is a tenor in the Camerata Singers of Monterey County. Active in Super Senior tennis competition, and recreational golf, bridge, and choir, retirement "suits him well."
In his youth, when Martin Graf was a prodigy of an immunology researcher, he made two breakthrough discoveries, according to Rich Simington. "Apparently looking for new challenges, he went on to a distinguished career as an allergy physician in private practice. But the research genes must have been passed to his physician son, Jonathon, who has just published his discovery of a test for Kawasaki Disease, an illness in young children that often leads to heart problems. Martin and his wife, Judy, continue to live in Chevy Chase, MD.
"It was Andre Billeci's interest in drafting, model-making, and design that initially drew him to Alfred as a student," says Rich. "His specialty was working with wood as art. But as a young faculty member he was encouraged by Professor John McMahon to start a glass course for ceramic engineers. And that's how Andy became the initiator of Alfred's art glass program that today is nationally recognized. When he left Alfred to live in Florida, he couldn't take Alfred's glass furnaces along. So he returned to wood as his principal interest. He has created museum-quality pieces which are found throughout his home in Vero Beach, FL, where he lives with his wife, Carol."
Sylvia H. Weinstein Levinson is retired in San Diego, CA. But she is active in the San Diego arts community; is a board member of Border Voices Poetry Project, a literacy program for students kindergarten-12th grade; and is a volunteer with KSDS jazz radio. She was awarded first prize in the 2004 poetry contest by the American Society on Aging and first prize in the San Diego African-American Writers and Artists, Inc.'s 2004 poetry contest.
1961
Larry Cagle retired from the New York State Dept of Health in 2000, where he finished his career after initially spending 12 years in academia; and has become such an avid hiker that he edited the third edition of Adirondack Trails:Central Region published by the Adirondack Mountain Club. He has also learned to play the piano, does genealogical research (having grandfathers on both sides of the Civil War), and travels in his 78 Fiat Spider. Best of all, he is able to enjoy time with Elsie, his wife of 43 years, and their children and grandchildren.
Barbara O'Connor Yee moved to Washington state in 1988. She kept busy as a public health nurse until retiring in 2004, and the Air Force Reserve where she was a Lt Colonel until 1998. Barb has a daughter, Suzanne in Los Angeles, and a son Jim, in Charlotte, NC, and three grandchildren.
Jack L'Amoreaux has been promoted to VP Technology for Applied Ceramics in Atlanta. He has learned that Walter Reed is also in Atlanta, and is looking for him.
Joel Moskowitz was profiled for his leadership in the ceramic engineering field in a recent issue of Ceramic Industry. Moskowitz, who serves on the AU Board of Trustees, is chairman of the board and CEO of Ceradyne Inc. in Costa Mesa, CA.
From time to time in the lowcountry of South Carolina, Richard Gross sees the Ries brothers between their golf expeditions. Chuck '62 got a law degree from Albany Law School before fulfilling his active duty in the Judge Advocates General Corps. He has now been in Cohoes, NY, with his law firm for thirty years, specializing in elder law. He lives with his wife, Debbie '62, except when hanging out with his brother, Bill '65. Bill got his DDS from SUNY Buffalo, was then with the Public Health Service in Chinle, AZ, before returning to Buffalo to get his doctorate. He has been on the faculties of Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Wake Forest Medical Center, and is presently at the Medical University of South Carolina. You can find Chuck and Bill playing golf together in South Carolina in the fall and spring; in summer they fish the same lake in Ontario that they did growing up.
From Rich Simington: "Edwin Post '61 enjoyed a visit with former AU basketball coach, Pete Smith, who celebrated his 80th birthday this year. Also visiting was former AU basketball great, Warren Sutton '61. Edwin's main sport is tennis. He plays competitively on three teams. All three teams went to their state finals tournament with two of them finishing second in New York. He also 'called lines' last semester at a World Team Tennis tournament in Schenectady, NY. Edwin and his wife, Tina, live in Slingerlands, NY.
AU will honor alumnus during its commencements ceremony. Joel who graduated from AU in 1961 with a degree in ceramic engineering, is founder, president and ceo of California-based Ceradyne Inc. the company makes the Small Arms Protective Insert, a light-weight ceramic plate that is used in the body armor of American soldiers. He will receive a doctor of science degree, honoris causa. In 2004, Moskowitz received Israel's Albert Einstein Technology Award. Ceradyne was listed by Forbes magazine as "one of the 200 Best Small Companies in America." Under Moskowitz's leadership, the company has grown from $30 million annually in 1999 to more tha $215 million in 2004. In addition to body armor inserts, the company makes armor for aircraft, tanks, customized cars and limousines. Moskowitz has been a member of AU's Board of Trustees since 1983. He and his wife Ann are members of AU's Society of Benefactors--those whose lifetime contributions to the university exceed $1 million.
Volunteer Profile from St. Louis Science Center: Howard Miller has been a Science Center Volunteer since June 2000. Penny began her career in June 2003. Howard and Penny work our Special Exhibits (currently Gadget Lab), but also regularly come in when we are in need of clerical/administrative help. They are also regular volunteers for special events, most recently working the huge Christian Family night on Feb. 8, 2005. Prudence Ann Brungard Memorial Award Howard and Penny Miller have been volunteers with EFA since 1991. In their 14 years of dedicated and selfless service, they have donated time and energy to nearly every program from the Friday Night Socilas, dining out for Life, Carnival and the HIV/STD Hotline. Their generosity doesn't stop there. The Millers are also regular donors to the agency. Howard is a former librarian whose Volunteer resume includes Church Deacon and an User at the Fox Theatre. He became involved with the agency after learning that a friend had been dianosed with HIV. Penny began volunteering shortly thereafter. Both Millers are still active Dining Out For Life hosts are are always ready to assist the agency in any way possible. We congratulate and thank them for their years of selfless caring and dedication to our Mission. Carnival International.
Volunteer Profile from St. Louis Science Center: Howard Miller has been a Science Center Vlunteer since June 2000. Penny began her Science Center career in June 2003. Howard and Penny work our Special Exhibits (currently Gadget Lab), but also regularly come in when we are in need of clerical/administrative help. They are also regular volunteers for special events, most recently working the huge Christian Family night on February 8,2005. Prudence Anne Brungard Memorial Award to Howard and Penny Miller Howard and Penny MIller have been Volunteers with EFA since 1991. In their 14 years of dedicated and selfless service, they ahve donated time and enegy to nearly every program from the Friday Night Socials, Dining Out For Life, Carnival, and the HIV/STD Hotline. Their generosity doesn't stop there. The Millers are also regular donors to the agency. Howard is a former librarian whose Volunteer resume includes Church Deacon and an Usher at the Fox Theatre. He became involved with the agency after learning that a friend had been diagnosed with HIV, Penny began volunteering shortly thereafter. Both Millers are still active Dining Out For Life hosts and are always ready to assist the agency in any way possible. We congratulate and thank them for their years of selfless caring and dedication to our mission. Carnivale International.
Article - Uncle Sam - If Frank Capra, the legendary Hollywood filmmaker, were still around making movies today, it's a cinch he'd option The Joel Moskowitz Story. (Complete article in Joel's folder)
1962
Thomas J. Sage Jr., 63, died Sept. 25, 2004. A lifetime resident of Pawling, NY, he was a banker and coached little league and youth hockey. He is survived by a wife; his mother; a son; and a sister.
From Rich Simington: "Charles Ries played football at Alfred, before moving on to Albany Law and then serving in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Army. There he handled cases high profile enough to appear in Time magazine and on the NBC Huntley-Brinkley Report. One of his opposing counsels was the noted attorney, William Kuntsler. Today Chuck handles less notorious cases as the managing partner of the law firm Wertime, Robinson and Ries in Cohoes where he lives with his wife, Debbie (Dixon) '62, whom he met when he was a dishwasher at the Brick."
From Rich Simington: "Charles Ries played football at Alfred, before moving on to Albany Law and then serving in the Judge Advocate General Corps in the Army. There he handled cases high profile enough to appear in Time magazine and on the NBC Huntley-Brinkley Report. One of his opposing counsels was the noted attorney, William Kuntsler. Today Chuck handles less notorious cases as the managing partner of the law firm Wertime, Robinson and Ries in Cohoes where he lives with his wife, Debbie (Dixon) '62, whom he met when he was a dishwasher at the Brick."
Linda Yablon Bresnick reports that she and her husband Stu went to Veracruz, Mexico, at the end of October 2004 to work on the annual Habitat for Humanity Project. Along with more than 2,000 other volunteers, including Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter, they built 75 houses for needy families in five days. The volunteers came from all over the Western Hemisphere. Their house had a crew of 24, from the US, Canada, Mexico and Brazil, 20 to 70 years old. They worked 10 hours a day in the heat and sun and built a two-bedroom/one-bath 650-square-foot home.The new homeowners worked along with them each day. Leticia, the owner of the house they built, was "overwhelmed by the generosity of people who had come so far at their own expense to help build houses for strangers." Linda reported that "it was one of the most memorable and rewarding (as well as hardest) weeks of our lives." For those interested in the program, check out www.habitat.org/jcwp/2004." Linda works half time at UC Davis on the WHEL Breast Cancer Research Study. Her husband is the Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity of Yolo County. The couple has two daughters, two sons-in-law, and two grandsons all living nearby.
From Rich Simington: "So you think you know someone famous? You do if you know Bob Chaikin. Here are some of his classmates in elementary school in the Bronx: Rob Reiner, Penny Marshall, Calvin Klein, Ralph Lauren and Alfred alumni Robert Klein '62 and Al Uger '61, the first producer of the TV classic, All in the Family. Today Bob earns fame as the founder and CEO of the prestigious Belknap Dental Associates in New Hampshire where he lives with his wife, Nancy."
From Rich Simington: "It was a treat that Norman DeVolder was able to slip some holiday cards past the moose patrolling the roads in rural Belgrade, ME, where he is enjoying retirement."
From time to time in the lowcountry of South Carolina, Richard Gross sees the Ries brothers between their golf expeditions. Chuck '62 got a law degree from Albany Law School before fulfilling his active duty in the Judge Advocates General Corps. He has now been in Cohoes, NY, with his law firm for thirty years, specializing in elder law. He lives with his wife, Debbie '62, except when hanging out with his brother, Bill '65. Bill got his DDS from SUNY Buffalo, was then with the Public Health Service in Chinle, AZ, before returning to Buffalo to get his doctorate. He has been on the faculties of Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Wake Forest Medical Center, and is presently at the Medical University of South Carolina. You can find Chuck and Bill playing golf together in South Carolina in the fall and spring; in summer they fish the same lake in Ontario that they did growing up.
1963
From Rich Simington: "If you have confidence in air flight, thank Hank Mix. He's an executive in a company that manufactures and repairs bearings in airplane engines. This is not a profession able to tolerate the occasional bad day. Whe he's not checking tolerances, Hank plays classical piano and runs. He and his wife, Linda (Lindblom)'64, live in Marietta, GA."
From Rich Simington: "After graduating from Alfred as an art major, John Morrette set out on a traditional path as a high school art teacher. But over time he developed an increasing fascination with the celebrations and ceremonial dress of Native Americans. Today he is a long-term member of one of only four non-Native American groups in the United States officially sanctioned by tribes to perform revered ceremonies in authentic dress. John designs and creates his own outfits according to the specific custom of each tribe and each ceremony. He's also an active volunteer at the Native American museum in Cobleskill. John and his wife, Mary, continue to live in Scotia, NY."
Joseph Rosenberg is becoming active with senior and veterans groups. He was recently elected president of Psychological Operations Veterans Association at the biennial reunion in Fayetteville, NC. He is also vice president of the Randallstown chapter of the National Association of Retired Federal Employees, judge advocate of Jewish War Veterans Post 117 and trustee-adjutant of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2677. He lives in Baltimore.
From Rich Simington: "Robert Tweadey IIis busier now than when he worked full time. An avid golfer and traveler, he and his wife Gloria have been to Italy and are soon leaving on trips to Hawaii, Phoenix and California. He volunteers at church. He and his wife live in Farmington, MI."
Joseph G. Yount, Jr. 63, died on Dec. 13, 2004. He retired as a ceramic engineer for U.S. Steel Research in Monroeville, PA, after 36 years of service. He is survived by his mother; a wife; a son; a sister; and six grandchildren.
1964
From Rich Simington: "Just for the record, Dorian Gray was not named after the character in the famous Oscar Wilde short story. But he's an interesting character himself. After a career with Ford as a ceramic engineer, today he's an avid gardener tending his own and several properties owned by his church. And he has an interest in missions having served in Sierra Leone. Dorian and his wife, Donna, live in Nashville, TN."
Jim Morgan III, 63, died on Oct. 10, 2004, in New York City. He was a Keban Award-winning lyricist who wrote songs for Quilt, a Musical Celebration, a musical made up of a patchwork of scenes and songs drawing on people memorialized on the NAMES Project Aids Memorial Quilt. He was an associate professor in the performing arts department at Middlesex County College in Edison, NJ. He is survived by his mother; and three brothers.
From Rich Simington: "With its growing interest in obesity and eating disorders, the federal government may finally be catching up with Victoria Klein Resnick. She's been working in the field for years as a private practitioner with two master's degrees, one in immunology and one in dietetics. And if you want to hear some fascinating hypotheses which are a graduate student's dream for a dissertation topic, ask her about her professional observations about eating disorders in young men. Resnick and her husband, Marty '64, live in Shaker Heights, OH."
From Rich Simington: "Sure Carl Zahler has done a lot of ceramic engineering since leaving AU. Among others, he's worked for Kelsey Hayes, TRW and Hayes Albion. He's supervised a project to locate and build a manufacturing plant from scratch, and to design company-wide company computerization. But Carl's passion is creating computers. Starting from scratch and building them piece by piece. He's been doing it for more than 20 years in his spare time. Right now he has five PCs he's built and two laptops. He smartly decided it was so much fun he should work it full time. So today he is the troubleshooter at Digilink Computers in Jackson, MI. Carl and his wife, Shirley, live in Spring Arbor.
1965
From Rich Simington: "If Larry Adlerstein had been a guest on the old TV show, 'What's My Line?', they would have had to make it a three-hour special. He's done it all. Larry says he 'remakes' himself every five years. So he's been a campus radical. And a philosopher. He's an attorney. And a potter. He's been a carpenter and a real estate mogul. He's been a Vista volunteer and then developed and operated poverty health care clinics in the South for the federal government. Today, he owns and operates 12 large retail art supply stores called Artist & Craftsman Supply located coast to coast in nine different states. However, he says this five-year adventure is almost over."
From Rich Simington: "There's a western and an eastern Carol Oster Olson. The western Carol is a highly regarded ceramic engineer who earned professional distinction during her career with companies in Texas and California. Eastern Carol volunteers at church and a local art group and pursues her interest in landscape photography. Carol and her husband, Rob, are retired in Kennebunk, ME."
Harry B. Skinner is chair of orthopedic surgery and a member of the faculty of the school of engineering at the University of California-Irvine. He is planning on returning for the 40th reunion.
Guner Sumer teaches ceramics at Anadolu University in Eskisehir, Turkey, and has written his ninth book, Quality Control and Standardization.
From Rich Smington: "We've all heard it before; ceramic engineers can do anything. But the stories keep coming. Tom Washer is an executive in a company that mines rare earth. Know how many others there are in the company in America? One. The owner. Because the products Tom sells all over the world are mined in China. And Tom just started up an auto repair business too. Tom and his wife, Patty, live in Murfreesboro, TN.
From time to time in the lowcountry of South Carolina, Richard Gross sees the Ries brothers between their golf expeditions. Chuck '62 got a law degree from Albany Law School before fulfilling his active duty in the Judge Advocates General Corps. He has now been in Cohoes, NY, with his law firm for thirty years, specializing in elder law. He lives with his wife, Debbie '62, except when hanging out with his brother, Bill '65. Bill got his DDS from SUNY Buffalo, was then with the Public Health Service in Chinle, AZ, before returning to Buffalo to get his doctorate. He has been on the faculties of Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Wake Forest Medical Center, and is presently at the Medical University of South Carolina. You can find Chuck and Bill playing golf together in South Carolina in the fall and spring; in summer they fish the same lake in Ontario that they did growing up.
1966
From Rich Simington: "Now that she's retired from her accomplished engineering career, Janet Burlingame Bailey's passion is gardening. And it's apparently a contact sport because she gardened so much in the last year she hurt herself. Of course, she 'competes' at two different locations so there's always something that needs to be done. Janet and her husband, Wally, live in Northville, MI, but you can often find them at their other home in Seneca Lake, NY."
From Rich Simington: "If you like folks who help others, you'd love Sheila Kessler Chrzan. Since leaving Alfred her whole life has been in service to others working in children's protective services, rape counseling, family day care, public assistance and more. Then she went to law school and today is a staff attorney for Cobb County Legal Aid. Sheila and her husband, Dave '67, live in Roswell, GA."
From Rich Simington: "When David Ely was a little guy he loved to watch his grandmother cook. So at AU his senior thesis was about the food industry in Allegany County. And he spent a good part of his career working in companies that provided food to others. Then he started his own company, Innovative Food Concepts, consulting about food, then designing kitchens and today designing furnishings for a variety of kitchen settings. For 12 years Dave wrote a food column for a professional food journal. Dave and his wife, Brenda, live in Marietta, GA."
From Rich Simington: "Barbara Jean (Siebert) Maurer, the world's most effective monitor of fascinating Internet traffic, is enjoying teaching elementary school. She recently took a break to travel to Los Cabos, Mexico, to celebrate a special birthday, staying in a penthouse looking out on the Sea of Cortez. Barbara Jean continues to enjoy adjusting to living in what she calls the 'Boonies' in Colusa, CA."
From Rich Simington: "At first glance it's easy to think that Bill Robbins is best known for his distinguished research career studying automated guidance systems since his early work on the Trident missile system at the prestigious Charles Stark Draper Labs in Cambridge, MA. In fact he has a less obvious past as an avid athlete. At Alfred he played both lacrosse and football, and was the first lacrosse assistant coach at his alma mater. He finished his doctorate at MIT while playing rugby and lacrosse there. Bill and his wife, Diane, live in Newton Centre, MA."
1967
Bruce Cowgill, president and CEO of Saint-Gobain Containers in Muncie, IN, was profiled as a leader in the field of ceramic engineering in the Oct. 1, 2004, issue of Ceramic Industry.
From Rich Simington: "It may seem like there is more than one Moody Johnson. His Alfred friends know the athlete who was recruited out of Bath by Alex Yunevich. When his playing eligibility was used up, Alex asked Moody to stay on another year as coach. He went on to coach and teach for many years in the Rochester, NY, area. Then there's the entrepreneur Moody who bought a struggling company and developed it into an industry leader selling glass-coated devices. Now Moody is retired and looking for new challenges, living with his wife, Patty, in Pittsford, NY."
From Rich Simington: "Until S. Richard Merchant retired a couple of years ago, he was known as a talented executive in one of the finest, largest car companies in the world, Ford. After all he had an Alfred ceramic engineering degree and an MBA. Today, he still works around cars. Racecars. Dick is a big fan. So he volunteers at the nearby Michigan International Speedway, and he helps his wife in her consulting business operating executive team building seminars at racetracks around the country. Dick and Renee live in Brooklyn, MI."
From Rich Simington: "Arvid Pasto is over his Corvette phase, having owned and sold two of them. He no longer sings barbershop, and he thinks he may be downsizing his extensive mineral collection. But he continues to expand his extensive art glass collection. And he continues to direct one of the world's most sophisticated research labs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. Arvid and his wife, Elaine Haney '72, live in Oak Ridge, TN."
From Rich Simington: "After Pete Raneri spent nearly 20 years on the staff of their alma mater, mostly in admissions, when Pete and Kathie (Whitford) '71 moved to Johnstown, NY, 22 years ago and kept up the recruiting effort. Both taught in local high schools so they could scout the cream of the crop as potential Alfred students. In the past two years they have recruited a child of their postal carrier, and another whose father was a town police officer."
1968
Judith Olson Gregory '68 is among the artists to be featured in a lecture series, "Paper Trail: Work by Regional Artists," at the Memorial Art Gallery at the University of Rochester. Gregory's talk is scheduled for 2 p.m. March 6 in the gallery at 500 University Ave., Rochester, NY. The lecture series, which began Feb. 6 and continues through March 27, is being held in conjunction with "The Paper Sculpture Show" featuring two-dimensional and three-dimensional work by regional artists, including Gregory. The lectures are open to the public, free of charge. Fred '68 and Judy make their home in Rochester. They are the parents of two AU alums: Matthew Gregory '96 and Cristin Gregory '94.
Article "A faith that grows" Story on Bemus Point Methodist Church pastored by the Reverend Dan McBride.
1969
From Rich Simington: "George Basher's life has some unusual transitions. He came to Alfred to study business and switched majors to ceramic engineering. After graduating he returned home to help run the family business where he was a seventh-generation furniture maker. Then he went to a town council meeting to talk to council members about some land next to his house and pretty soon he was elected to the council. Today George is the New York State Director of Veteran's Affairs whose government agency provides benefits of $3 billion to New York vets. What George remembers from Alfred is washing pots to pay for college, and the slide rule he used in courses that he displays next to his AU degree in his office in Albany, NY. George and his wife, Karen '69, live in East Greenbush, NY."
From Rich Simington: "If you've not seen how Josephine Fish Cooley transforms gourds into art objects, you've missed a treat. Her work was recently featured at an artist reception and exhibition called 'Jo Cooley's Decorative Gourd Teapots' at Gallery Saratoga in Saratoga, CA. Or you can visit her home and studio in Campbell, CA."
From Rich Simington: "Stuart Silbergleit is the general counsel of the Energy Association of New York State whose members supply power to most of New York. Stu had to deal with the huge Northeast power blackout of 2003. He and his wife, Marlene, live in Glenmont, NY. "
Eric (Ric) Bershad is the grandfather of "a beautiful little girl, Ellie Kate Bershad. Someday I hope to bring her up to old AU to see the campus on a beautiful fall day." His business, Phillip Jeffries Ltd., has been featured on the Home and Garden TV Channel. "Ten years ago I named the company after my two boys, Phil and Jeff, hoping but never thinking they would be interested in working with the old man (and my wife whom I dragged into the business). But after graduating from Michigan and Duke, respectively, and working in other jobs for three years, they both came on board. We are currently the largest American distributor of 'green' environmentally friendly wallcoverings and fabrics that are made from the harvest of bamboo, palm, and sea grass and woven together with post-consumer recycled papers. Our materials are shown in 28 trade designer showrooms throughout the United States and in 21 foreign countries. Our customers range from the MGM Grand and Hyatt to thousands of individual designers and architects."
1970
Margaret "Peggy" Anderson died October 2003.
Kathy Moeschler Bujalski has been employed by the New Hanover County Public Library for more than seven years. She and her husband live in Wilmington, NC.
Timonthy Gibbs of Wellsville, NY, has been hired as a lecturer in the mathematics and physics department at Alfred State College.
From Rich Simington: "After 28 years as a bank executive and then a whole new career as a CFO of an entrepreneurial start up, it might be easy to think of David Kenyon as being risk averse. But not if you knew him at Alfred. As a freshman, one night he and a pal decided it would be a good idea to climb to the top of the highest communication tower in town and look around. Four years later someone doubted the feat, so Dave did it again. Unfortunately, this time the Alfred village police were official observers when he descended. Today, Dave keeps his feet on the ground where he lives with his wife, Maureen, in Hingham, MA."
1971
From Rich Simington: "After Pete Raneri spent nearly 20 years on the staff of their alma mater, mostly in admissions, when Pete and Kathie (Whitford) '71 moved to Johnstown, NY, 22 years ago and kept up the recruiting effort. Both taught in local high schools so they could scout the cream of the crop as potential Alfred students. In the past two years they have recruited a child of their postal carrier, and another whose father was a town police officer."
June 13, 2005--National Atlantic Holdings Corporation (NAHC) (Nasdaq: NAHC) today announced the election of Martin Krupnick Psy. D. to its Board of Directors filling a vacant seat, and his simultaneous appointment to the Board's Audit and Nominating/Corporate Governance Committees. Dr. Krupnick is President and CEO of IEP Youth Services, Inc. Freehold, NJ which is a non-profit organization in Monmouth County providing human services to childhood victims of sexual or drug abuse. Dr Krupnick has served in that position since 1986. He is a licensed psychologist in New Jersey and has practiced here since 1983. Dr, Krupnick a Marlboro Township resident, received a BA degree from AU and a MA degree and a doctorate in Psychology from Rutgers University. He serves as chair of Friends of Monmouth County Child Advocacy Center, Inc. and is a member of many professional associations.
1972
Article in Buffalo Business First "Unifrax manufactures success" Statements from William Kelly, Unifrax president and CEO.
From Rich Simington: "Arvid Pasto is over his Corvette phase, having owned and sold two of them. He no longer sings barbershop, and he thinks he may be downsizing his extensive mineral collection. But he continues to expand his extensive art glass collection. And he continues to direct one of the world's most sophisticated research labs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories. Arvid and his wife, Elaine Haney '72, live in Oak Ridge, TN."
1973
Article on "Adult club impresario Richard Snowden raises his profile" Richard Snowden first came into the public eye four years ago when he bought an adult entertainment club in Cheektowaga. Many wondered why this successful businessman would move his operations for Las Vegas to the Buffalo Niagra region. Usually it is the other way around. Then, Snowden and his wife, Danielle, bought the Miller Mansion on Nottingham Terrace in one of the region's highest profile real estate deals. They paid $995,000 cash for the landmark residence, plus another $305,000 - also cash - for some of its interior amenities. Snowden is about to make another name for himself by opening a swanky but traditional restaurant/night club in the former Shayleen's in downtown's BAC Building. Besides his Cheektowaga club, Rick's Tally-Ho, Snowden has a similar adult entertainment venue in Rochester and another that he is about to buy in Syracuse. To top it off, he is considering running for county executive in two years. On the Republican line, of course. "If elected, I'd only take a $1 a year in pay," Snowden says. (More in file).
Mom. daughter take relationship to a new degree - Mother's Day 2005 Nancy and daughter Lauren will graduate together from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. Nancy received a Liberal Arts Degree 30 years ago from AU manages a mentoring program at Gulf Coast Community Care in Clearwater. She decided to go back to college and get a Master's in Social Work.
1974
Article "In Provoking Thought: What Colleges Should Do for Students", Leland Miles, former president of Alfred University and the University of Bridgeport (CT), attempts to identify the key skills and attributes that students should receive from a college education.
1975
Headline: Creating a Look: Oinewild Woman Offers Advice on Art The collecting of fine art has shaped the business world of Debra Rhodes-Smith, a Pinehurst woman, who has been involved in this unusual occupation for more than 25 years. Working on an international scale, she has compiled art collections for major corporations, as well as private clients. Since she and her husband moved to Pinehurst over four years ago, she has expanded her services to individuals who have private residences. "Many people who have moved into new homes in the area are interested in repositioning the art work they have brought with them, or even adding to it," she says. "The light here is different, and often they like to consider art that blends in with the overall design of a new home. Sometimes they just want help in hanging existing art work they are afraid of putting too many holes in freshly painted and textured walls."
Alfred alum chosen to lead Kentucky education group - William G. Scott of Frankfurt will become executive director of the association July 1, 2005. A 10-year manager of services to school districts with an even more extensive career in programs that support children and families has been selected as the chief executive of the Kentucky School Boards Association (KSBA).
Harris E. Kershnar has been selected for inclusion in the 2005-06 edition of "The Best Lawyers in America," based on his expertise in the field of labor and employment law.
1977
Stephen E. Cohen is president/owner of North Star Counseling, LLC, Newburyport, MA, launched in January 2005. He also works part-time as a consultant in electrical engineering in underwater exploration assisting a company in converting from copper cables to fiber optics.
Claudia Chase, owner and president of Mirrix Tapestry and Bead Looms, and an artist exhibiting and selling her art work in New England galleries, was elected to the House of Representatives in New Hampshire. A Democrat in a Republican district, Claudia is the first Democrat to be elected in her district since the Civil War and the first female Democrat ever to be elected in the district.
Stefanie Gray Livolsi, Glenview, IL, writes that "son Peter, who attended Alfred U. 1999-00, just received his MFA in directing from the American Film Institute, Los Angeles, and is, for the second year, an Esquire Filmaker finalist."
Stefanie Gray Livolsi, Glenview, IL, writes that "son Peter, who attended Alfred U. 1999-00, just received his MFA in directing from the American Film Institute, Los Angeles, and is, for the second year, an Esquire Filmaker finalist."
I am divorced (10 years now) and have one son who will be 15 in July. (Alexander Cohen) North Star Counseling, LLC officially opened it's doors in Jan. 2005. So far it is going very well! I run the business end and my partner is a therapist who handles all the therapy. I am also working as a part-time Electrical Engineer in underwater exploration, helping a company convert from copper cables to fiber optics. (I received my BSEE in 1988.)
1978
Article "Augusta Art Guild announces winner of poster contest" The third and last judge of the contest was Nicholas Bonner, who graduated with a BFA from AU, and a MFA from Ohio University. He has taught at various universities and currently is Foundation Coordinator of the Art Department at Northern Kentucky University. He is currently working in his chosen medium - clay.
Nancy L. Falk, a doctoral candidate in George Mason's College of Nursing and Health Science, began working last September at the office of U.S.. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, D-NM, as the John Heinz Senate Fellow for 2004-05. The fellowship, named for the late U.S. Sen. John Heinz, is dedicated to continuing his work to improve the quality of life for elderly Americans through sound public policy and legislative action.
JoAnne Many is a dentist in Norfolk, VA.
Margy Guzman is a teacher in Rochester, NY. She'd love to her from her Theta Sisters and asks, "Sue Boyd, where are you?" Jody Nurik, Potomac, MD, is "enjoying life with my 5-year-old daughter. Would enjoy hearing from 'old' Theta sisters."
Jane M. Sherwin, Manchester, NH, works in a progressive cardiac care unit as a clinical ladder II preceptor and relief charge nurse. She volunteers with a local animal rescue league and enjoys outdoor activities as time allows.
Some sad news for the Class of '78. Suzanne Alice (Lester) Walker, 49, of Venetia, PA, formerly of Friendship, NY, died May 30, 2005, in UPMC-Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh. She will be remembered for her warmth, wit, and her 11-year battle with cancer that was an inspiration to all who knew her. She was married to Davis C. Walker and they were co-owners of Woods Quality Cabinetry Co., Eighty Four, PA. In addition to her husband, she is survived by two daughters, Victoria (Tori) and Kelley; a step-son, Davis, Jr.; her parents, Marilyn (Childs), '86, and Laurence Lester; and a brother, Donn H. Lester.
Ann Barnard Faulkner, Allegany, NY, is a probation officer. Her son Timothy received his bachelor's degree in materials science and will receive his MBA in August 2005 from AU. Daughter Evelyn will be a senior math and education major at AU.
"David Kaplan is a role model for the proposition that when you do something well, your reward is that you are asked to do more," says Rich Simington after a recent visit with David and his wife, Vickie, '94. According to Rich, "David was such a good professor (including 14 years at Alfred) he was recruited to be a dean in charge of a department with four accredited disciplines. With these responsibilities under control, he agreed to serve as the elected president of the American Counseling Association, with 45,000 members. His reward was that he was recruited to leave his academic life to become full-time chief professional officer of the Association, where he works today. David and his wife are former members of the A. E. Crandall Hook and Ladder Co. in Alfred, and now make their home in Arlington, VA.
1979
From your class correspondent: Dawn Pavlina Murphy wrote she is currently working at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, as an oncology nurse practitioner. She has been married for 19 years to Kevin and they have two children Erin, 18, and Connor, 14. They currently live in Cherry Hill, NJ.
Rob Bartlett is a regular, in-studio guest of Don Imus on "Imus in the Morning Show." He's a contract player writing and performing some of the show's more popular cast of characters.
Karen Plummer Morse returned to neonatal ICU at Strong Hospital, Rochester, NY, six-and-a-half years ago. She keeps busy with her family -- husband, Peter; Meghan, 22; Courtney, 20; Mike, 18; and Geoff, 15.
Dr. Laurie R. Murray, chair, Cedar Crest College (PA) Nursing Department, was the featured speaker at the "Nurses Night Out" program hosted by the Blue Mountain Health System, May 9, 2005.
1980
Ellen Rothman Sullivan, RN, SDC, Brookfield, CT, has worked 15 years as staff development coordinator at the Danbury Health Care Cente. She has four children: Brian, 21, a senior at Northeastern University majoring in judicial studies; Dan, 19, a sophomore at Central Connecticut State University; Scott, 15, a high school junior who wrestles; and Rebecca, 11, a sixth grader who plays ice hockey, soccer, and softball.
Word has been received of the untimely death of Michael Pyrek, on Feb. 8, 2005. Michael taught biology and environmental science, and was involved in sports, at Indian River (NY) High School, where he was beloved by his students.
Mark Brostoff presented a career services workshop titled "Gay Lives, Straight Jobs - Sexual Orientation and Career Decision Making" at the 2004 National Association of Colleges and Employers meeting in Orlando and 2004 Midwest ACE Conference, Chicago. This year, Mark will speak at the National Career Development Association Conference, Orlando, the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) Conference, Milwaukee, the CCCDA Diversity in Career Counseling Conference, Hartford, CT, and at several university campuses across the United States. Mark is associate director of undergraduate career services at the Kelley School of Business, Indiana University-Bloomington. He is also an adjunct faculty member at the Kelley School of Business and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, where he lectures on entrepreneurship, marketing, and emergency management. In 2004, the Indiana University Kelley School of Business honored Mark with the John Deere and Co. Advancing Diversity Award. He is chair of the Monroe County Citizens Corps Council and co-host of BloomingOUT, which he describes as "the only Indiana news and public affairs radio show dedicated to the issues and events of the gay community."
We received a note that Ted Wimberg, who is a counselor at Douglas Junior High School in Woodland, CA, was named the "California Lottery Teacher of the Year" for 2004. He's married to Sharon Laymon Wimberg, '80, who is a clinical researcher for Parexel International, Woodland.
Susan Garrison, Monroe, CT, has been named Bridgeport Hospital's 2004-05 Nurse Manager of the Year for her leadership ability and outstanding service to patients and colleagues. She is a certified orthopedic nurse.
Richard Brow is chair of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Missouri-Rolla. He and his wife, Theresa, have two children, Katie, 10, and Adelaide, 6.
Artist Christie Scheele presented a 60-piece exhibit in April and talked about her painting at the Albert Shahinian Fine Art Gallery, Poughkeepsie, NY.
Headline: Artist will discuss her love of painting at city gallery Christie Scheele began painting at age 5. Her mother was an artist, so brushes and paints were easily accessible. Forty two years later, Scheele is still painting. She says her creativity is not formulaic; she keeps moving and remains loyal to her work.
Susan Garrison of Monroe has been named Bridgeport Hospital's 2004-2005 Nurse Manager of the Year for her leadership ability and outstanding service to patients and colleagues. A 25-year hospital employee, Garrison was a staff nurse and assistant head nurse before assuming the nurse manager's role on the hospital's Orthopedics-Neurosurgery-Urology Unit. "Sue displays all the qualities of a true leader," said Anne Aquila, director of surgical and critical care services. She sets the pace, not expecting more from those she leads than she expects from herself. She sets clear expectations, is supportive of her peers and treats everyone with respect and dignity, always with what is best for the patient in mind." Earlier this year, Garrison's unit was honored by the hospital with an annual Making the Difference Award as direct-patient-care area for its outstanding customer service. Garrison received a bachelor's degree in nursing from AU in New York and a master's in health systems management from Sacred Heart University. She is a certified orthopedic nurse.
From 1985 to 1998, before he joined the staff at the University of Missouri-Rolla where he chairs the materials science and engineering department Brow was on the technical staff of the Ceramics Development Division at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. He has become known internationally for his research on the properties and applications of glasses. He studies how the changes in composition of glass affect its physical and chemical properties such as making it stronger or enabling it to withstand high temperatures. (More of this article in his file folder.)
1981
Brenau University in Gainsville honors Nikulich-Barrett. Margaret Nikulich-Barrett, assistant professor of nursing, received the 2005 Ann Austin Johnston Outstanding Faculty Award. Nikulich-Barrett, Gainsville, was presented the $2,500 award, which also carries the highest honors, by Brenau University President Ed Schrader. Nikulich-Barrett has served Brenau since 2002. She holds a doctorate in nursing science and a Master of Science from State University on NY in Albany and a bachelor's degree in nursing from AU. The award is made possible by Donald C. Johnston of Dublin in honor of his wife, Ann Austin Johnston, a Brenau graduate.
Linda Hupp Double says she is "living in Farmington, NY, and would love to hear from friends. " Her e-mail is hkymom@rochester.rr.com. She's married to Robert Double, '80.
Another AU couple is Marguerite DeSalvio Chayka and Paul Chayka who are making their home in New Milford, CT, with their two boys, ages 12 and 16. Marguerite is in her sixth year teaching high school physics and chemistry, and Paul is in his fifth year as a consultant, providing precursor expertise and equipment design for chemical vapor deposition.
Another AU couple is Marguerite DeSalvio Chayka and Paul Chayka who are making their home in New Milford, CT, with their two boys, ages 12 and 16. Marguerite is in her sixth year teaching high school physics and chemistry, and Paul is in his fifth year as a consultant, providing precursor expertise and equipment design for chemical vapor deposition.
Margaret Nikulich-Barrett, assistant professor of nursing at Brenau University, Gainesville, GA, received the 2005 Ann Austin Johnston Outstanding Faculty Award, which carries a $2,500 prize.
Daniel G. Shephard has been elected by the Martin Marietta Materials Inc. Board of Directors to serve as a senior vice president of the corporation, reflecting increased responsibilities he has taken on over the past two years. He is responsible for the Magnesia Specialties unit and the MidAmerica aggregates business, along with business development, marketing and technical services, and capital planning for the corporation.
1982
The Snowmass, CO, Village Sun did a Valentine's Day feature on three couples whose marriages exemplify romantic love, "the core connection that is the focal point of family and community." One of the couples they profiled was Susan and Doug Casebeer. Doug is the program director of ceramics at Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Snowmass, where he has been for nearly 20 years. He received his MFA from AU, then the couple moved to Jamaica where Doug worked for the United Nations, running a ceramics factory. Life in Jamaica brought the couple closer together. "We became good friends there," Doug told the reporter. "We had to rely on each other for everything." They moved to Snowmass Village in 1987, and now have two children, Emily and Logan.
Chris Belden has joined Applied Materials, Santa Clara, CA, as group vice president and general manager of global operations.
1983
Works by Eddie Dominguez, assistant professor in the Department of Art and Art History, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, are included in "Diane Marsh & Eddie Domingez: Parallel Perceptions of Land, Form & the Natural Condition," on view at the Museum of Nebraska Art, Kearney, NE, through Aug. 28, 2005. Landscape, human tragedy, triumph, and form are all explored in the exhibition. Eddie's work is also included in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; the Cooper-Hewitt, New York City; the Museum of Fine Arts, Santa Feb, NM; and the Cleveland Institute of Art, Ohio.
Jeanne Lemmond Nailos, Pittsfield, MA, is an elementary teacher and technical support specialist. Daughter Jennifer is attending the University of Alabama, and daughter Stephanie is at Rochester (NY) Institute of Technology where she was the catcher for the softball team this past season.
Dr. Madeline Dalton continues to make news. In the television coverage prior to the Academy Awards, Dr. Brad Bowden, professor of biology, and his wife, Joan, caught a segment on CNN during which Madeline talked about her landmark study about how showing cigarette smoking in popular movies has influenced teen-agers to begin smoking. Since the study was released a couple of years ago, there has been increased media attention directed at the portrayal of smoking in movies, and this year, California teen-agers "gave thumbs-up to movies with no smoking," according to the CNN piece.
Gardner Realty has added Steve Brady as a sales agent. Formerly head tennis professional at Palmetto Dunes Tennis Center, Brady is originally from New York. He moved to Hilton Head Island in 1995. (South Carolina) He has a Master's Degree in counseling from AU. he specializes in residential and investment properties.
1984
Article "Winging it at Wassenberg" VanWert center attracts moths; World-renowned prints collection.
Bob Beyer has been hired as an assistant basketball coach at the University of Dayton. He spent the 2003-04 season as a regional advance scout for the Houston Rockets and Miami Heat. This followed four years as an assistant at the University of Albany, NY, four at Siena (NY) College, and one at Wisconsin, before becoming head coach at Siena. He then joined the Northwestern University staff for two years, was hired by Bobby Knight at Texas Tech and spent two years there, then served a year as an assistant with the Toronto Raptors.
Magic of Moths - Exhibit dispels myths about these beautiful creatures - "Joseph Scheer: Moths" an art exhibition - Brevard Museum of Art and Science, Melbourne - through June 26, 2005.
Tom and Wendy Black Mancarella are the proud parents of Lea Patricia Mancarella, born Jan. 5, 2005. She weighed 8 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 22 1/2 inches long. All are well. Tom will be retiring from the Monroe County Sheriff's Office in three years.
Tom and Wendy Black Mancarella are the proud parents of Lea Patricia Mancarella, born Jan. 5, 2005. She weighed 8 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 22 1/2 inches long. All are well. Tom will be retiring from the Monroe County Sheriff's Office in three years.
Joseph Scheer, professor of printmaking at Alfred, presented an exhibit this spring at the Brevard Museum of Art and Science, Melbourne, FL. "Joseph Scheer: Moths" featured 55 prints, all gigantically enlarged, painstakingly constructed digital images of moths found mostly in the eastern United States.
Richard Dolan owns a professional resume-writing service but his passion is researching and writing about UFOs. He has been a contributor to The History Channel, has written dozens of articles and, in 2000, published Volume One of "UFOs and the National Security State: An Unclassified History." The book documents global UFO encounters from 1941-73. He is working on a second volume that would present evidence through the 1990s.
Steven Weinman is a microbiologist for the Food and Drug Administration. He and his wife Vivyan, two daughters, and son live on Long Island. He would like to hear from friends at sweinman@ora.fda.gov.
Edward Rinaldo has been named principal of Jarvis Junior-Senior High School, Mohawk, NY. He had been associate director of alternative programs at Madison-Oneida BOCES.
1986
Subject: Class of 86 Class of 86 update: Jackie (Larson) Matthews ('86), her husband, Tom, and their three children, Patrick (13), Michaela (11) and Conor (8) Have relocated to Shaker Heights, Ohio, a Cleveland suburb. Jackie has taken a position at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation as the External Reporting Manager for the Office of Quality. Thanks Jackie Jackie Matthews, R.N., M.S. Manager, External Reporting Office of Quality-W15 Cleveland Clinic Foundation 9500 Euclid Ave Cleveland, Ohio 44195 Phone: 216.444.2047 Fax: 216.636.3732 matthej1@ccf.org
1987
In August of 2003, I was appointed to an administrative position as the District Director of Mathematics and Compensatory Education for the the Monticello School District in Monticello, NY. The school has 3600 students. On July 24, 2004, I married Susan Eastburne. John DiCerbo (87) and Tobias Schwartz were fellow Alfredians in attendance. Susan and I live in Rock Hill, NY located in the Catskills 80 miles from NYC. Gary Furman Class of 87 PS Tobias Schwartz attended Alfred from 83-86. He was married in November 2001. He and his wife, Lisa, have a son born in June 2004. He currently works for KPMG.
1988
"More cause for pride in our alma mater! We learn that the Kyocera Corp., Kyoto, Japan, will make a substantial contribution to endow the University School of Engineering. With the income from the endowment, the University will add four distinguished faculty members who will establish a fine ceramics/nanotechnology research center to develop and explore new applications in advanced materials. In recognition of such generosity, the School of Engineering will be named in honor of Dr. Kazuo Inamori, the founder and chair emeritus of Kyocera Corp. The class of 1943 joins all alumni and friends of AU in expressing our appreciation for such a magnanimous gift.
1992
Article - "O'Connor to lead arts demonstration" - The Scotch Plains and Fanwood Arts Association will present a demonstration by William O'Connor following the 7:30 pm business meeting at the Fanwood Community House.
Just wanted to announce the birth of our son Daniel William on 03/16/2005. Mom, baby and big sister are doing fine down here in Austin, TX. Regards, Chris Rando AU Class of '92
1993
Peter is an assistant professor of painting and printmaking at Virginia Commonwealth university, Richmond VA, where he has been teaching electronic media for the past four years. He received his BFA from SUNY, Albany, and his MFA in Integrated Electronic Art from AU. His Internet work, "hypertemps' is part of the exhibition at the University of Richmond Museums on 3/15/05.
Outstanding Administrator: Dan Napolitano, director of Student Activities. "Dan is the most creative force within Student Affairs.," according to the citation. "His work has directly resulted in our division's ability to create a truly comfortable and welcoming environment for every student. Dan has built the ALANA program into something in which students can take pride. Dan is open and collaborative; he is one of the rare administrators that is liked by absolutely everyone and has never compromised his professionalism to achieve that."
South Bend Tribune - Business People - Goshen--Three new members have been elected to the board of directors of Indiana Lakeland Girl Scout Council. They will serve three-year terms for the organization which serves the interests and needs of girls and young women in Elkhart, Whitley, Noble and Kosciusko counties. Bradley Pfister, a mortgage loan officer with Standard Federal Bank, Elkhart, was elected to the board after completing an unexpired one-year term. He received his BA degree from AU in New York.
1994
Michaela Cavallaro, the editor of Mainebiz, has been named the National Small Business Journalist of the Year for 2005 - the US Small Business Administration's top award. Earlier this year, she had been named the Maine 2005 Small Business Journalist of the Year and New England Regional Small Business Journalist of the Year. The national award will be presented to Ms Cavallaro in Washington DC at the SBA 2005 Awards Expo, on April 27. Ms Cavallaro, a resident of South Portland, is a 1990 graduate of Manasquan High School. As editor of the award-winning statewide business newspaper, Ms. Cavallaro oversees the paper's editorial direction and content, contributes news stories and features, supervises the editorial staff, and represents Mainebiz at business events. The paper, which celebrated its 10th anniversary last year, is published every two weeks. She was named editor in March 2004, four years after being hired as the paper's first staff reporter. She has held positions of associate editor and managing editor at the paper, and hold's a master's degree in writing and publishing from Emerson College, Boston, Mass. and is a 1994 graduate of AU.
"David Kaplan is a role model for the proposition that when you do something well, your reward is that you are asked to do more," says Rich Simington after a recent visit with David and his wife, Vickie, '94. According to Rich, "David was such a good professor (including 14 years at Alfred) he was recruited to be a dean in charge of a department with four accredited disciplines. With these responsibilities under control, he agreed to serve as the elected president of the American Counseling Association, with 45,000 members. His reward was that he was recruited to leave his academic life to become full-time chief professional officer of the Association, where he works today. David and his wife are former members of the A. E. Crandall Hook and Ladder Co. in Alfred, and now make their home in Arlington, VA.
1995
Chinese ceramicist to exhibit - The contemporary ceramic sculpture of an internationally renowned artist, Jiansheng Li, briefly will be displayed from Thursday April 14 to April 21 in the Dowd Fine Arts Gallery at SUNY Cortland. Li is president of Jingdezhen Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China. He is teaching an Introduction to Chinese Ceramics course this spring at SUNY Cortland. "My work is a reflection of the spirit of ancient Chinese traditions with strong individual expression," said Li Li holds Master of Fine Art degree from NYS College of Ceramics at AU and Jingdezhen Ceramic Institute in Jiangxi Province, China.
Emily (Bologna) Balcom '95 writes: My husband and I have recently purchased our first home and are settling in Utica. The first year of marriage and working at Utica College has been a fast one. We would love to hear from other AU grads in the Utica area-our address and phone are 1622 Harrison Avenue, Utica, NY 13501 315-797-6595 or e-mail at emily_bologna@hotmail.com
1996
Article "Coffee and Tea Room offers "Photography for Women's Lives" - Danielle Goodyear previously worked as visiting assistant professor of photography at Lycoming College and as workshop manager at the Center for Photography, Woodstock, NY. Her fine art photographs have been exhibited and published nationally. She received a bachelor 's degree in fine arts from AU and a master's degree in photography from the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, GA. She is pursuing a certificate in education and starting her own photography business.
1997
Dennis King, AU information security officer, was recently awarded the Certified Information Systmes Security Professional certification. (CISSP) The certification recognizes mastery of an international standard for information security. King joined AU in 1994 as an information technology technician. He assumed the duties of information security officer in 2003 and became full time in 2004.
2001
Patriot News "Potter with area roots helps mold TV show" - A 1990 Palmyra Area High School graduate will be featured throwing pottery on an upcoming segment of the Jane Pauly Show. Tina Gebhart of Baltimore and her mother, Ruth Barley of the Palmyra area, trekked to New York City recently with Tina's pottery wheel, clay and an assortment of her ceramics. the folks at NBC found her through the nonprofit gallery Baltimore Clayworks, where her artwork is featured. The Clayworks is hosting the annual conference of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Art this week.
Tina Gebhart, a 1990 Palmyra Area High School graduate will be among women artists featured on "The Jane Pauly Show" next month. Gebhart graduated cum laude in 1995 from Penn State, where she studied fine arts, art history and French. In 2001, she received a master's in fine arts from AU College of Ceramics. She teaches at the Maryland Hall School for the Arts, Annapolis, MD and has taught ceramic tecniques at the Baltimore Clayworks.
2003
Article "Specialist aids lab students" - Brian Tibbens office is located dead center in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications computer labs. From his door, Tibbens can see lines of eager students waiting for the labs two laser printers to spit out their advertising projects and communications law term papers. Tibbens cramped, windowless office seems inaccessible - a small flight of stairs leading to his desk keeps him above ground level - but the Newhouse computer consultant is one of the most familiar faces in the college, both inside and outside the labs. Tibbens maintains the Newhouse labs and does everything from managing software installations to performing basic hardware repairs.
Artist Suzie Kelly, the webmaster and principal designer of the Ferrum Magazine for alumni and friends o the college, will be featured in a summer exhibit in the E. Taylor Greer Gallary at the college. Kelly received a Bachelor of Arts Degree in fine arts from AU.
2004
Krista Lynn Carlson, a graduate student in the School of Engineering at AU, received the Dr. Richard C. Martin Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award and the Materials Research Society Outstanding Senior Poster Award at the Univ Honors Convocatjon. Carlson received her BS from AU in May 2004, was recognized for the presentation for her senior thesis in a formal poster session.
Rotenberg & Co. has added Jennifer L. Stoddard to the assurance department as a staff accountant. Stoddard is a graduate of AU.
Births
Christine Blockley, '87 and her husband, Ron had their second child, Sophia, on Sept. 8, 2004.
Adam Ginsberg, 1990 and Christine (Hollings) Ginsberg, 1990, have two children Sophia, age 3 and Max, age 1.
Adam Ginsberg, 1990 and Christine (Hollings) Ginsberg, 1990 now have two children, Sophia, age 3 and Max, age 1.
Jennifer Iudice (Morse '91) and Joe Iudice ('91) welcomed their third child on May 7th 2005, Quinn Michael
Jennifer Iudice (Morse '91) and Joe Iudice ('91) welcomed their third child on May 7th 2005, Quinn Michael.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: <Dara.lanier@comcast.net> In April, 2005 Dara (DeLong) Lanier ('92) and Jason Lanier ('93) welcomed their third boy- Declan Eoin. He joins two brothers Liam (4) and Maxfield (2). They live in a suburb of Philadelphia, PA. Thank you! Dara Lanier
David (93) and Kimberly Singer (93) just had their second daughter, Lily on 02-25--05. That is their second daughter. (First is Ella born on 10-30-02).
David (93) and Kimberly Singer (93) just had their second daughter, Lily on 02-25-05. That is their second daughter. (First is Ella born on 10-3-02).
From: @comcast.net> In April, 2005 Dara (DeLong) Lanier ('92) and Jason Lanier ('93) welcomed their third boy- Declan Eoin. He joins two brothers Liam (4) and Maxfield (2). They live in a suburb of Philadelphia, PA. Thank you! Dara Lanier
Megan (Hughes) Orsini, "94 and her husband, David announce the birth of their son Quinn Ellis Orsini who was born on May 23, 2005 at 7:52 PM. He weighed 7 lbs. 2 oz. and was 20 inches long.
Greg and Cindy Arserio '96 are pleased to announce the birth of the son: Nathan Gregory Arserio on April 11, 2005. Cindy currently works for Ultralife Batteries, Inc. where she is the manager of New Product Development.
Deaths - Alumni
Mary Newton Bruder, 64, died Aug. 16, 2004. A native of Cortland, NY, she was known as "The Grammar Lady" and wrote a column that was distributed to many newspapers. In 1988 she established a Grammar Hot Line. In 1997 she launched a Web site -- grammarlady.com. She lived in Mt. Lebanon, PA, but traveled extensively, conducting workshops and seminars in teaching English as a foreign language in Egypt, Morocco, Senegal and Argentina. She was the author of several books and articles on language and linguistics, including, Much Ado About A Lot: How to Mind Your Grammar in Print and in Person. She is survived by a daughter, Mary Beth Newton Bruder '00; her mother; and a brother.
Engagements
Cassandra Smith '04 will be marrying Dannnon Lewis Lamphier or Woodhull on July 2, 2005
Marriages
David Gunzburger (1974) was married on February 15, 2005 to Tanya Mendel. Tanya has an 11 year old daughter, Chelsea, who, like Tanya, has enriched David's life greatly.
Sara Hammond, '99 and Kenny McGee, '98 were married on April 9, 2005.
Sara Hammond, '99 and Kenny McGee, '98 were married April 9th, 2005
Lynn Marie Barberi '00 and Joseph R. Puma '01 were married on June 12, 2004.
Lynn Marie Barberi, '00 and Joseph R. Puma, '01 were married on June 12, 2004.